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Molecular detection of rickettsial agents of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from wild birds of PanamaBermúdez, SergioDomínguez, LillianOchoa, IsisOliveira, Jonathan GonçalvesDe Lemos, Elba,Regina SampaioCastillo, BernardoSmith, DioreneHerrera, JorgeOgrzewalska, Maria2020DOI: info:10.11158/saa.25.4.3Systematic and Applied Acarologyv. 25No. 4622632622–6321362-1971
Bermúdez, Sergio, Domínguez, Lillian, Ochoa, Isis, Oliveira, Jonathan Gonçalves, De Lemos, Elba,Regina Sampaio, Castillo, Bernardo, Smith, Diorene, Herrera, Jorge, and Ogrzewalska, Maria. 2020. "Molecular detection of rickettsial agents of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from wild birds of Panama." Systematic and Applied Acarology 25 (4):622–632. https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.25.4.3
ID: 154934
Type: article
Authors: Bermúdez, Sergio; Domínguez, Lillian; Ochoa, Isis; Oliveira, Jonathan Gonçalves; De Lemos, Elba,Regina Sampaio; Castillo, Bernardo; Smith, Diorene; Herrera, Jorge; Ogrzewalska, Maria
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from wild birds in Panama were tested for the presence of tick-borne pathogens as Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, Borrelia, Hepatozoon sp., and Babesia. Overall 124 ticks were found in 57 birds belonging to 28 species: Amblyomma longirostre (32 larvae, 1 nymph), Amblyomma nodosum (30 nymphs), Amblyomma geayi (15 larvae, 1 nymph), Amblyomma varium (5 larvae, 2 nymphs), Amblyomma naponense (2 larvae), Amblyomma ovale (2 larvae), and Amblyomma calcaratum (1 larva). DNA of Rickettsia amblyommatis was detected in 65% of A. longirostre, 69% of A. geayi and 14% of A. varium. Moreover, results from two larvae of A. longirostre showed DNA of unidentified Rickettsia sp. No DNA of Borrelia, Bartonella, Anaplasmataceae neither Babesia nor Hepatozoon was detected. These results expand knowledge about the host for immature Amblyomma ticks in Panama and show the first data of Rickettsia in ticks collected from birds in this country.
Framework species approach proves robust in restoring forest on fire prone invasive grass: A case study from PanamaBoeschoten, Laura E.Breugel, Michiel vanBailon, MarioBalbuena, JohanaNuñez, MiguelCerezo, ArturoHall, Jefferson S.2020DOI: info:10.1080/10549811.2020.1746915Journal of Sustainable Forestry1191–191054-9811
Boeschoten, Laura E., Breugel, Michiel van, Bailon, Mario, Balbuena, Johana, Nuñez, Miguel, Cerezo, Arturo, and Hall, Jefferson S. 2020. "Framework species approach proves robust in restoring forest on fire prone invasive grass: A case study from Panama." Journal of Sustainable Forestry 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1080/10549811.2020.1746915
ID: 155212
Type: article
Authors: Boeschoten, Laura E.; Breugel, Michiel van; Bailon, Mario; Balbuena, Johana; Nuñez, Miguel; Cerezo, Arturo; Hall, Jefferson S.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Grasses and fire pose a major challenge for forest restoration. Here we evaluate a case study of reforestation in an area invaded by the tall invasive grass Saccharum spontaneum in the Panama Canal Watershed. The project objectives were to (1) replace Saccharum with a forest, (2) restore a stratified mixed species forest and (3) sequester carbon. We aimed to compare the practice of forest restoration with a treatment grounded in theory. Therefore, the first species selection method followed business-as-usual: contractors planted any combination of 130 prescribed species. The second method followed the framework species approach, a mixture of 22 species was planted to ensure early shade, create a stratified forest over time, attract seed dispersers, and for their potential to fix N2. Both treatments showed successful restoration trajectories 8.5 years after planting, they did not differ in structural characteristics (stem density, basal area, aboveground biomass, height, and amount of Saccharum). However, based on the species present, the framework approach shows more potential to become a stratified forest. As the framework approach also withstood fires much better than the business-as-usual approach, we conclude that it improves restoration success in this human-dominated landscape.
A revision of the genus Psammogorgia Verrill, 1868 (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Octocorallia) in the tropical eastern Pacific OceanBreedy, OdaliscaGuzman, Hector M.2020DOI: info:10.3897/zookeys.961.54846ZooKeysv. 9611301–301313-2970
Breedy, Odalisca and Guzman, Hector M. 2020. "A revision of the genus Psammogorgia Verrill, 1868 (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Octocorallia) in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean." ZooKeys 961:1–30. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.961.54846
ID: 156864
Type: article
Authors: Breedy, Odalisca; Guzman, Hector M.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The species of the genus Psammogorgia Verrill, 1868 from the shallow waters of the tropical eastern Pacific were mainly described from 1846 to 1870. Very few contributions were published subsequently. Recently, the genus was revisited with the addition of two new species. However, a comprehensive generic study is still missing for the eastern Pacific. Psammogorgia is characterised by having axes cores without mineralisation, mainly coarse irregular spindles and thorny, leafy or tuberculate clubs coenenchymal sclerites and the anthocodial armature with distinct collaret and points arrangements. Herein a taxonomic revision of the genus is presented based on type material which was morphologically analysed and illustrated using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Comparative character tables are provided for comparison among species in the genus, along with a taxonomic key. Moreover, the taxonomic status of each species was analysed. The genus Psammogorgia comprises six valid species and two varieties, and three lectotypes and a new combination are proposed to establish the taxonomic status of these species.
A new species of the genus Psammogorgia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from the Hannibal Bank in Pacific PanamaBreedy, OdaliscaGuzmán, Héctor M.Murillo, CatalinaVargas, Sergio2020DOI: info:10.5343/bms.2019.0072Bulletin of Marine Sciencev. 96No. 1169180169–1800007-4977
Breedy, Odalisca, Guzmán, Héctor M., Murillo, Catalina, and Vargas, Sergio. 2020. "A new species of the genus Psammogorgia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from the Hannibal Bank in Pacific Panama." Bulletin of Marine Science 96 (1):169–180. https://doi.org/10.5343/bms.2019.0072
ID: 152760
Type: article
Authors: Breedy, Odalisca; Guzmán, Héctor M.; Murillo, Catalina; Vargas, Sergio
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The octocoral fauna occurring at mesophotic depths (from 40 to 150 m) has been relatively unexplored. Recent expeditions to Hannibal Bank, a guyot seamount off Pacific Panama have yielded new octocoral species and new records for the tropical eastern Pacific. Herein, we describe a new species for the genus Psammogorgia , Psammogorgia pax sp. nov., characterised by having a whitish flabellate colony with orange polyp apertures, slightly raised and sparse calyces, and colourless coenenchymal sclerites, which are mostly spindles and large wart-clubs. A preliminary molecular phylogenetic analysis supports the differences between the new species with other congener and other related taxa.
Do bats use guano and urine stains to find new roosts? Tests with three group-living batsBrown, Bridget K. G.Leffer, LaurenValverde, YeseniaToshkova, NiaNystrom, JessicaPage, Rachel A.Carter, Gerald G.2020DOI: info:10.1098/rsos.201055Royal Society Open Sciencev. 7No. 92054-5703
Brown, Bridget K. G., Leffer, Lauren, Valverde, Yesenia, Toshkova, Nia, Nystrom, Jessica, Page, Rachel A., and Carter, Gerald G. 2020. "Do bats use guano and urine stains to find new roosts? Tests with three group-living bats." Royal Society Open Science 7 (9):https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.201055
ID: 157272
Type: article
Authors: Brown, Bridget K. G.; Leffer, Lauren; Valverde, Yesenia; Toshkova, Nia; Nystrom, Jessica; Page, Rachel A.; Carter, Gerald G.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Many animals use social cues to find refuges. Bats can find roosts using the echolocation and social calls of conspecifics, but they might also use scent cues, a possibility which is less studied. The entrances of bat roosts are often marked by guano and urine, providing possible scent cues. We conducted eight experiments to test whether bats use the scent of guano and urine to find potential roosts. In field experiments, we tested if Molossus molossus (velvety free-tailed bats) in Panama and Eptesicus fuscus (big brown bats) in Ohio would investigate artificial roost boxes that were scented with guano and urine more often than a paired unscented control. We did not detect any difference in flights near the scented versus unscented roosts, and we detected only one entrance into any artificial roost (scented). In six captive experiments, we tested for the attraction of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bats) and Molossus molossus to areas scented with guano and urine, under several conditions. Results were mixed, but overall suggested that the scent of guano and urine does not act as a strong lure for the tested bat species. We suggest that further tests of olfaction-based roost choice in bats should manipulate existing scent cues on familiar roosts.
Host Records for Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) Reared from Seeds and Fruits in PanamaBrown, John W.Gripenberg, SofiaBasset, YvesCalderón, OsvaldoSimon, IndiraFernandez, CatalinaCedeno, MarjorieRivera, Marleny2020DOI: info:10.4289/0013-8797.122.1.12Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washingtonv. 122No. 1122412–240013-8797
Brown, John W., Gripenberg, Sofia, Basset, Yves, Calderón, Osvaldo, Simon, Indira, Fernandez, Catalina, Cedeno, Marjorie, and Rivera, Marleny. 2020. "Host Records for Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) Reared from Seeds and Fruits in Panama." Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 122 (1):12–24. https://doi.org/10.4289/0013-8797.122.1.12
ID: 154782
Type: article
Authors: Brown, John W.; Gripenberg, Sofia; Basset, Yves; Calderón, Osvaldo; Simon, Indira; Fernandez, Catalina; Cedeno, Marjorie; Rivera, Marleny
Keywords: NMNH; NH-Entomology; STRI
Abstract: A survey of Lepidoptera reared from seeds and fruits primarily on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, yielded 444 specimens of Tortricidae representing 20 species. Nearly 90% of reared tortricids and 65% of the species are members of the tribe Grapholitini, a group that includes numerous economically important pests of fruit worldwide. We present host records for the following species: Histura panamana Brown, Platynota obliqua Walsingham complex, Platynota subargentea Walsingham, Spinipogon triangularis Brown, Cryptaspasma perseana Gilligan and Brown, Steblopotamia streblopa (Meyrick), Cydia pyraspis (Meyrick) complex, Eriosocia guttifera (Meyrick), Riculorampha ancyloides Rota and Brown, Grapholita mabea Razowski, Ricula croceus Brown, Ricula lacistema Brown, Ricula sp. 1, Ricula sp. 2, Talponia sp. 1, Talponia sp. 2, and four unidentified Grapholitini. In a comparison of studies focused on fruit- and seed-feeding insects in Thailand, Panama, and Kenya, Grapholitini represented 73% (in Thailand) to 90% (in Panama) of the total number of reared specimens of Tortricidae, and 45% (in Kenya) to 65% (in Panama) of the total number of tortricid species. However, a similar survey in Papua New Guinea produced considerably different results, with Grapholitini representing 46% of the tortricid specimens and only 20% of the species.
Protein-encoding ultraconserved elements provide a new phylogenomic perspective of Oestroidea flies (Diptera: Calyptratae)Buenaventura, ElianaLloyd, Michael W.Perilla Lopez, Juan ManuelGonzalez, Vanessa L.Thomas-Cabianca, AriannaDikow, Torsten2020DOI: info:10.1111/syen.12443Systematic Entomology0307-6970
Buenaventura, Eliana, Lloyd, Michael W., Perilla Lopez, Juan Manuel, Gonzalez, Vanessa L., Thomas-Cabianca, Arianna, and Dikow, Torsten. 2020. "Protein-encoding ultraconserved elements provide a new phylogenomic perspective of Oestroidea flies (Diptera: Calyptratae)." Systematic Entomology https://doi.org/10.1111/syen.12443
ID: 156429
Type: article
Authors: Buenaventura, Eliana; Lloyd, Michael W.; Perilla Lopez, Juan Manuel; Gonzalez, Vanessa L.; Thomas-Cabianca, Arianna; Dikow, Torsten
Keywords: NMNH; NH-Entomology; STRI
Abstract: The diverse superfamily Oestroidea with more than 15 000 known species includes among others blow flies, flesh flies, bot flies and the diverse tachinid flies. Oestroidea exhibit strikingly divergent morphological and ecological traits, but even with a variety of data sources and inferences there is no consensus on the relationships among major Oestroidea lineages. Phylogenomic inferences derived from targeted enrichment of ultraconserved elements or UCEs have emerged as a promising method for resolving difficult phylogenetic problems at varying timescales. To reconstruct phylogenetic relationships among families of Oestroidea, we obtained UCE loci exclusively derived from the transcribed portion of the genome, making them suitable for larger and more integrative phylogenomic studies using other genomic and transcriptomic resources. We analysed datasets containing 37-2077 UCE loci from 98 representatives of all oestroid families (except Ulurumyiidae and Mystacinobiidae) and seven calyptrate outgroups, with a total concatenated aligned length between 10 and 550 Mb. About 35% of the sampled taxa consisted of museum specimens (2-92 years old), of which 85% resulted in successful UCE enrichment. Our maximum likelihood and coalescent-based analyses produced well-resolved and highly supported topologies. With the exception of Calliphoridae and Oestridae all included families were recovered as monophyletic with the following conclusions: Oestroidea is monophyletic with Mesembrinellidae as sister to the remaining oestroid families; Oestridae is paraphyletic with respect to Sarcophagidae; Polleniidae is sister to Tachinidae; Rhinophoridae sister to (Luciliinae (Toxotarsinae (Melanomyinae + Calliphorinae))); Phumosiinae is sister to Chrysomyinae and Bengaliinae is sister to Rhiniidae. These results support the ranking of most calliphorid subfamilies as separate families.
Seasonal plasticity of thermal tolerance in antsBujan, JelenaRoeder, Karl A.Yanoviak, Stephen P.Kaspari, Michael2020DOI: info:10.1002/ecy.3051Ecologyv. 101No. 6e03051e030511939-9170
Bujan, Jelena, Roeder, Karl A., Yanoviak, Stephen P., and Kaspari, Michael. 2020. "Seasonal plasticity of thermal tolerance in ants." Ecology 101 (6):e03051. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3051
ID: 155047
Type: article
Authors: Bujan, Jelena; Roeder, Karl A.; Yanoviak, Stephen P.; Kaspari, Michael
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Analyses of heat tolerance in insects often suggest that this trait is relatively invariant, leading to the use of fixed thermal maxima in models predicting future distribution of species in a warming world. Seasonal environments expose populations to a wide annual temperature variation. To evaluate the simplifying assumption of invariant thermal maxima, we quantified heat tolerance of 26 ant species across three seasons that vary two-fold in mean temperature. Our ultimate goal was to test the hypothesis that heat tolerance tracks monthly temperature. Ant foragers tested at the end of the summer, in September, had higher average CTmax compared to those in March and December. Four out of five seasonal generalists-species actively foraging in all three focal months-had, on average, 6°C higher CTmax in September. The invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, was among the thermally plastic species, but the native thermal specialists still maintained higher CTmax than S. invicta. Our study shows that heat tolerance can be plastic, and this should be considered when examining species-level adaptations. Moreover, the plasticity of thermal traits, while potentially costly, may also generate a competitive advantage over species with fixed traits and promote resilience to climate change.
Comparison of methods for rhythm analysis of complex animals' acoustic signalsBurchardt, Lara S.Knörnschild, Mirjam2020DOI: info:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007755PLOS Computational Biologyv. 16No. 41221–221553-7358
Burchardt, Lara S. and Knörnschild, Mirjam. 2020. "Comparison of methods for rhythm analysis of complex animals' acoustic signals." PLOS Computational Biology 16 (4):1–22. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007755
ID: 155225
Type: article
Authors: Burchardt, Lara S.; Knörnschild, Mirjam
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Analyzing the rhythm of animals' acoustic signals is of interest to a growing number of researchers: evolutionary biologists want to disentangle how these structures evolved and what patterns can be found, and ecologists and conservation biologists aim to discriminate cryptic species on the basis of parameters of acoustic signals such as temporal structures. Temporal structures are also relevant for research on vocal production learning, a part of which is for the animal to learn a temporal structure. These structures, in other words, these rhythms, are the topic of this paper. How can they be investigated in a meaningful, comparable and universal way? Several approaches exist. Here we used five methods to compare their suitability and interpretability for different questions and datasets and test how they support the reproducibility of results and bypass biases. Three very different datasets with regards to recording situation, length and context were analyzed: two social vocalizations of Neotropical bats (multisyllabic, medium long isolation calls of Saccopteryx bilineata, and monosyllabic, very short isolation calls of Carollia perspicillata) and click trains of sperm whales, Physeter macrocephalus. Techniques to be compared included Fourier analysis with a newly developed goodness-of-fit value, a generate-and-test approach where data was overlaid with varying artificial beats, and the analysis of inter-onset-intervals and calculations of a normalized Pairwise Variability Index (nPVI). We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the methods and we also show suggestions on how to best visualize rhythm analysis results. Furthermore, we developed a decision tree that will enable researchers to select a suitable and comparable method on the basis of their data.
A major locus controls a biologically active pheromone component in Heliconius melpomeneByers, Kelsey J. R. P.Darragh, KathyMusgrove, JamieAlmeida, Diana AbondanoGarza, Sylvia FernandaWarren, Ian A.Rastas, Pasi M.Kučka, MarekChan, Yingguang FrankMerrill, Richard M.Schulz, StefanMcMillan, W. O.Jiggins, Chris D.2020DOI: info:10.1111/evo.13922Evolution; international journal of organic evolutionv. 74No. 2349364349–3641558-5646
Byers, Kelsey J. R. P., Darragh, Kathy, Musgrove, Jamie, Almeida, Diana Abondano, Garza, Sylvia Fernanda, Warren, Ian A., Rastas, Pasi M., Kučka, Marek, Chan, Yingguang Frank, Merrill, Richard M., Schulz, Stefan, McMillan, W. O., and Jiggins, Chris D. 2020. "A major locus controls a biologically active pheromone component in Heliconius melpomene." Evolution; international journal of organic evolution 74 (2):349–364. https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13922
ID: 154060
Type: article
Authors: Byers, Kelsey J. R. P.; Darragh, Kathy; Musgrove, Jamie; Almeida, Diana Abondano; Garza, Sylvia Fernanda; Warren, Ian A.; Rastas, Pasi M.; Kučka, Marek; Chan, Yingguang Frank; Merrill, Richard M.; Schulz, Stefan; McMillan, W. O.; Jiggins, Chris D.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Understanding the production, response, and genetics of signals used in mate choice can inform our understanding of the evolution of both intraspecific mate choice and reproductive isolation. Sex pheromones are important for courtship and mate choice in many insects, but we know relatively little of their role in butterflies. The butterfly Heliconius melpomene uses a complex blend of wing androconial compounds during courtship. Electroantennography in H. melpomene and its close relative H. cydno showed that responses to androconial extracts were not species-specific. Females of both species responded equally strongly to extracts of both species, suggesting conservation of peripheral nervous system elements across the two species. Individual blend components provoked little to no response, with the exception of octadecanal, a major component of the H. melpomene blend. Supplementing octadecanal on the wings of octadecanal-rich H. melpomene males led to an increase in the time until mating, demonstrating the bioactivity of octadecanal in Heliconius. Using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, we identified a single locus on chromosome 20 responsible for 41% of the parental species' difference in octadecanal production. This QTL does not overlap with any of the major wing color or mate choice loci, nor does it overlap with known regions of elevated or reduced FST . A set of 16 candidate fatty acid biosynthesis genes lies underneath the QTL. Pheromones in Heliconius carry information relevant for mate choice and are under simple genetic control, suggesting they could be important during speciation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
In situ SEM/EDS compositional characterization of osteocytes and blood vessels in fossil and extant turtles on untreated bone surfaces; different preservational pathways microns awayCadena, Edwin-Alberto2020DOI: info:10.7717/peerj.9833PeerJv. 8e9833e98332167-8359
Cadena, Edwin-Alberto. 2020. "In situ SEM/EDS compositional characterization of osteocytes and blood vessels in fossil and extant turtles on untreated bone surfaces; different preservational pathways microns away." PeerJ 8:e9833. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9833
ID: 157074
Type: article
Authors: Cadena, Edwin-Alberto
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Osteocytes and blood vessels are the main cellular and tissue components of the bone tissue of vertebrates. Evidence of these soft-tissue microstructures has been widely documented in the fossil record of Mesozoic and Cenozoic turtles. However, all these studies have characterized morphologically and elementally these microstructures via isolation from the fossilized bone matrix where they were preserved or in ground sections, which could raise skepticism about the results due to potential cross-contamination or reagents effects. Fossil turtle bones from three different localities with distinct preservation environments and geological settings, including Mongolemys elegans from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia, Allaeochelys crassesculpta from the Eocene of Germany, and a podocnemidid indet. from the Miocene of Colombia are studied here. Bone from two extant turtle species, Lepidochelys olivacea , and Podocnemis lewyana , as well as a commercial chicken Gallus gallus were used for comparisons. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analyses performed directly on untreated fresh surfaces show that osteocytes-like in the fossil turtle bone are mostly composed of iron and manganese. In contrast, the in situ blood vessels-like of the fossil turtles, as well as those from the extant taxa are rich in elements typically organic in origin (carbon and nitrogen), which are absent to minimally present in the surrounding bone or rock matrix; this suggests a possible endogenous composition for these fossil structures. Also, the results presented here show that although originally both (osteocytes and blood vessels) are organic soft components of bone as evidenced in the extant turtles and chicken, they can experience completely different preservational pathways only microns away from each other in the same fossil bone.
Valanginian occurrence of Pelomedusoides turtles in northern South America: revision of this hypothesis based on a new fossil remainCadena, Edwin-Alberto2020DOI: info:10.7717/peerj.9810PeerJv. 81121–122167-8359
Cadena, Edwin-Alberto. 2020. "Valanginian occurrence of Pelomedusoides turtles in northern South America: revision of this hypothesis based on a new fossil remain." PeerJ 8:1–12. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9810
ID: 156946
Type: article
Authors: Cadena, Edwin-Alberto
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Pelomedusoides constitutes the most diverse group of Mesozoic and Cenozoic side-necked turtles. However, when it originated is still being poorly known and controversial. Fossil remains from the Early Cretaceous (Valanginian) Rosa Blanca Formation of Colombia were described almost a decade ago as potentially belonging to Podocnemidoidea (a large subclade inside Pelomedusoides) and representing one of the earliest records of this group of turtles. Here, I revise this hypothesis based on a new fragmentary specimen from the Rosa Blanca Formation, represented by a right portion of the shell bridge, including the mesoplastron and most of peripherals 5 to 7. The equidimensional shape of the mesoplatron allows me to support its attribution as belonging to Pelomedusoides, a group to which the previously podocnemidoid material is also attributed here. Although the Valanginian pelomesudoid material from Colombia is still too fragmentary as to be considered the earliest indisputable record of the Pelomedusoides clade, their occurrence is at least in agreement with current molecular phylogenetic hypotheses that suggest they split from Chelidae during the Jurassic and should occur in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous fossil record.
The first remains of vertebrates from the Paleocene Lisama formation, Middle Magdalena Valley Basin of ColombiaCadena, Edwin-Alberto2020DOI: info:10.1016/j.jsames.2020.102745Journal of South American Earth Sciencesv. 1031027451027450895-9811
Cadena, Edwin-Alberto. 2020. "The first remains of vertebrates from the Paleocene Lisama formation, Middle Magdalena Valley Basin of Colombia." Journal of South American Earth Sciences 103:102745. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2020.102745
ID: 156585
Type: article
Authors: Cadena, Edwin-Alberto
Keywords: STRI
A new Miocene turtle from Colombia sheds light on the evolutionary history of the extant genus Mesoclemmys Gray, 1873Cadena, Edwin-AlbertoVanegas, AndrésJaramillo, CarlosCottle, John M.Johnson, Thomas A.2020DOI: info:10.1080/02724634.2019.1716777Journal of Vertebrate Paleontologyv. 39No. 51111–110272-4634
Cadena, Edwin-Alberto, Vanegas, Andrés, Jaramillo, Carlos, Cottle, John M., and Johnson, Thomas A. 2020. "A new Miocene turtle from Colombia sheds light on the evolutionary history of the extant genus Mesoclemmys Gray, 1873." Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 39 (5):1–11. https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.2019.1716777
ID: 154852
Type: article
Authors: Cadena, Edwin-Alberto; Vanegas, Andrés; Jaramillo, Carlos; Cottle, John M.; Johnson, Thomas A.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Mesoclemmys is the most diverse extant genus of South American pleurodires or side-necked turtles, with at least 10 species inhabiting fluvial to littoral environments. Despite this high extant diversity and extensive geographic distribution, the evolutionary history and fossil record of this genus are completely unknown. Here, we describe the first fossil record of this genus, which supports a previous molecular-based hypothesis that indicates a minimum split time of 13.5 Ma between this and other genera of South American chelids. Mesoclemmys vanegasorum, sp. nov., is represented by a nearly complete shell (carapace and plastron) and some postcranial bones found in the middle Miocene (13.6 ± 0.2 Ma), La Victoria Formation, Tatacoa Desert, Colombia, increasing the turtle paleodiversity of La Venta Fauna. It differs from all extant species of Mesoclemmys by vertebral scute 1 reaching the sutural boundary between peripherals 1 and 2; shorter cervical and marginal scutes 1 to 3; pleurals 1 very advanced over the peripherals; pygal bone with a posteromedial shallow notch; vertebral 5 covering half of the pygal bone; small extragulars reaching only half of the epiplastra length; and a fine microvermiculation of the shell. Our phylogenetic results show a close relationship between M. vanegasorum, sp. nov., and the extant M. hogei. The overall morphology and size of Mesoclemmys genus have remained relatively constant for at least the last 13.6 million years. However, its geographic distribution has decreased drastically in northwestern South America, being restricted today to the lower region of the Magdalena River Basin.
Eggs of echinoids separated by the Isthmus of Panama harbor divergent microbiotaCarrier, Tyler J.Lessios, Harilaos A.Reitzel, Adam M.2020DOI: info:10.3354/meps13424Marine Ecology Progress Seriesv. 648169177169–1770171-8630
Carrier, Tyler J., Lessios, Harilaos A., and Reitzel, Adam M. 2020. "Eggs of echinoids separated by the Isthmus of Panama harbor divergent microbiota." Marine Ecology Progress Series 648:169–177. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps13424
ID: 156866
Type: article
Authors: Carrier, Tyler J.; Lessios, Harilaos A.; Reitzel, Adam M.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Relationships between animals and their associated microbiota are dependent on both the evolutionary history of the host and on the environment. The majority of studies tend to focus on either one of these factors but rarely consider how both determine the community composition of the associated microbiota. One 'natural experiment' to test how evolutionary history, shared environments, and the interaction between these factors drive community composition is to compare geminate species pairs. Echinoids separated by the Isthmus of Panama are suitable for this comparison due to their known evolutionary history and differences in the oceanographic characteristics of the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. By comparing the bacterial communities of the eggs of Echinometra and Diadema geminate species pairs, we show that each pair of geminate species associates with a distinct bacterial community in a pattern consistent with phylosymbiosis, and that the interaction between the evolutionary history of the host and the environment best explains differences in these communities. Moreover, we found that the relative abundance of particular bacterial taxa differed considerably between the 2 bodies of water and that the 2 Caribbean Echinometra species were dominated by unclassified bacterial taxa within the phototrophic Oxyphotobacteria . Taken together, data presented here support the hypothesis that the bacterial communities associated with geminate species are another characteristic of these species that have diverged in ~2.8 million years of isolation.
Disproportionate extinction of South American mammals drove the asymmetry of the Great American Biotic InterchangeCarrillo, Juan D.Faurby, SørenSilvestro, DanieleZizka, AlexanderJaramillo, CarlosBacon, Christine D.Antonelli, Alexandre2020DOI: info:10.1073/pnas.2009397117Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of AmericaArticle 202009397Article 2020093970027-8424
Carrillo, Juan D., Faurby, Søren, Silvestro, Daniele, Zizka, Alexander, Jaramillo, Carlos, Bacon, Christine D., and Antonelli, Alexandre. 2020. "Disproportionate extinction of South American mammals drove the asymmetry of the Great American Biotic Interchange." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Article 202009397. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2009397117
ID: 157163
Type: article
Authors: Carrillo, Juan D.; Faurby, Søren; Silvestro, Daniele; Zizka, Alexander; Jaramillo, Carlos; Bacon, Christine D.; Antonelli, Alexandre
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The biological interchange between North and South America associated with the formation of the Isthmus of Panama is key to defining current gradients of species diversity. A major gap in our understanding of the interchange is its asymmetry, where mammals of North American origin attained higher diversity in South America than vice versa. The prevailing view is that this asymmetry resulted from higher origination of immigrant mammals in South America. In contrast, we find that asymmetry results from high extinction of native mammals in South America, which reduced the diversity of native mammals available to disperse northwards. These results shed light on the legacy of the biotic interchange to understand the current patterns of species diversity across the Americas.The interchange between the previously disconnected faunas of North and South America was a massive experiment in biological invasion. A major gap in our understanding of this invasion is why there was a drastic increase in the proportion of mammals of North American origin found in South America. Four nonmutually exclusive mechanisms may explain this asymmetry: 1) Higher dispersal rate of North American mammals toward the south, 2) higher origination of North American immigrants in South America, 3) higher extinction of mammals with South American origin, and 4) similar dispersal rate but a larger pool of native taxa in North versus South America. We test among these mechanisms by analyzing ∼20,000 fossil occurrences with Bayesian methods to infer dispersal and diversification rates and taxonomic selectivity of immigrants. We find no differences in the dispersal and origination rates of immigrants. In contrast, native South American mammals show higher extinction. We also find that two clades with North American origin (Carnivora and Artiodactyla) had significantly more immigrants in South America than other clades. Altogether, the asymmetry of the interchange was not due to higher origination of immigrants in South America as previously suggested, but resulted from higher extinction of native taxa in southern South America. These results from one of the greatest biological invasions highlight how biogeographic processes and biotic interactions can shape continental diversity.Datasets and code have been deposited in Zenodo (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3770347) (74).
Diversity and paleoenvironmental implications of an elasmobranch assemblage from the Oligocene–Miocene boundary of EcuadorCarrillo-Briceño, Jorge D.Villafaña, Jaime A.Gracia, Carlos DeFlores-Alcívar, F. FernandoKindlimann, RenéAbella, Juan2020DOI: info:10.7717/peerj.9051PeerJv. 81271–272167-8359
Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge D., Villafaña, Jaime A., Gracia, Carlos De, Flores-Alcívar, F. Fernando, Kindlimann, René, and Abella, Juan. 2020. "Diversity and paleoenvironmental implications of an elasmobranch assemblage from the Oligocene–Miocene boundary of Ecuador." PeerJ 8:1–27. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9051
ID: 155489
Type: article
Authors: Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge D.; Villafaña, Jaime A.; Gracia, Carlos De; Flores-Alcívar, F. Fernando; Kindlimann, René; Abella, Juan
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The occurrence and diversity of elasmobranchs from the Oligocene–Miocene boundary from Tropical America is poorly known in comparison with the paleodiversity from younger Neogene intervals of the region. Here we describe a new elasmobranch assemblage from the rich fossil site of Montañita-Olón (Dos Bocas Formation, Santa Elena, Ecuador), where other vertebrates have already been described: for example, sea turtles and cetaceans. We report a total of 27 elasmobranch taxa, 19 of which are new fossil records for Ecuador, 10 new records for the Central Eastern Pacific and four new records for South America. Additionally, in order to reconstruct the environment where these marine remains were deposited, we performed abundance, paleobathymetric and habitat preference analyses, concluding that they were likely deposited in an outer neritic (open shelf) environment. The study of Oligocene and early Miocene marine elasmobranchs faunas in Tropical America is key to addressing the issues in the evolutionary history of this group.
Temperate Forests Dominated by Arbuscular or Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Are Characterized by Strong Shifts from Saprotrophic to Mycorrhizal Fungi with Increasing Soil DepthCarteron, AlexisBeigas, MarieJoly, SimonTurner, Benjamin L.Laliberté, Etienne2020DOI: info:10.1007/s00248-020-01540-7Microbial ecology0095-3628
Carteron, Alexis, Beigas, Marie, Joly, Simon, Turner, Benjamin L., and Laliberté, Etienne. 2020. "Temperate Forests Dominated by Arbuscular or Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Are Characterized by Strong Shifts from Saprotrophic to Mycorrhizal Fungi with Increasing Soil Depth." Microbial ecology https://doi.org/10.1007/s00248-020-01540-7
ID: 156748
Type: article
Authors: Carteron, Alexis; Beigas, Marie; Joly, Simon; Turner, Benjamin L.; Laliberté, Etienne
Keywords: STRI
Soil abiotic and biotic properties constrain the establishment of a dominant temperate tree into boreal forestsCarteron, AlexisParasquive, VladBlanchard, FlorenceGuilbeault‐Mayers, XavierTurner, Benjamin L.Vellend, MarkLaliberté, Etienne2020DOI: info:10.1111/1365-2745.13326Journal of Ecology1141–141365-2745
Carteron, Alexis, Parasquive, Vlad, Blanchard, Florence, Guilbeault‐Mayers, Xavier, Turner, Benjamin L., Vellend, Mark, and Laliberté, Etienne. 2020. "Soil abiotic and biotic properties constrain the establishment of a dominant temperate tree into boreal forests." Journal of Ecology 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13326
ID: 154310
Type: article
Authors: Carteron, Alexis; Parasquive, Vlad; Blanchard, Florence; Guilbeault‐Mayers, Xavier; Turner, Benjamin L.; Vellend, Mark; Laliberté, Etienne
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Climate warming is expected to cause the poleward and upward elevational expansion of temperate plant species, but non-climatic factors such as soils could constrain this range expansion. However, the extent to which edaphic constraints on range expansion have an abiotic (e.g. soil chemistry) or biotic (e.g. micro-organisms) origin remains undetermined. We conducted greenhouse experiments to test if the survival and growth of a major North American temperate tree species, Acer saccharum (sugar maple), is independently or jointly constrained by abiotic and biotic properties of field-collected soils from within and beyond the species' elevational range. Abiotic factors, particularly low base cation concentrations, were major constraints to seedling establishment in boreal forest soils (beyond the range edge), but insufficient arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculum (biotic factor) also strongly reduced seedling performance in these soils. Synthesis. Our results suggest that forecasting future changes in forest composition under climate warming requires consideration of soil properties as well as the mycorrhizal status of tree species.
A new wave of marine fish invasions through the Panama and Suez canalsCastellanos-Galindo, GustavoRobertson, D. R.Torchin, Mark E.2020DOI: info:10.1038/s41559-020-01301-2Nature Ecology & Evolution131–32397-334X
Castellanos-Galindo, Gustavo, Robertson, D. R., and Torchin, Mark E. 2020. "A new wave of marine fish invasions through the Panama and Suez canals." Nature Ecology & Evolution 1–3. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-01301-2
ID: 156942
Type: article
Authors: Castellanos-Galindo, Gustavo; Robertson, D. R.; Torchin, Mark E.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Recent engineered expansions of the Panama and Suez canals have accelerated the introduction of non-native marine fishes and other organisms between their adjacent waters. Measures to prevent further invasions through canals should be incorporated into global shipping policies, as well as through local efforts.