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Showing 1-20 of about 35 results.
Long-Term Impacts of Invasive Insects and Pathogens on Composition, Biomass, and Diversity of Forests in Virginia's Blue Ridge MountainsAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Herrmann, ValentineCass, Wendy B.Williams, Alan B.Paull, Stephen J.Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B.Helcoski, RyanTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.Cosma, Christopher T.Ferson, Abigail E.Kittle, CarolineMeakem, VictoriaMcGregor, Ian R.Prestipino, Maya N.Scott, Michael K.Terrell, Alyssa R.Alonso, AlfonsoDallmeier, FranciscoMcShea, William J.2020DOI: info:10.1007/s10021-020-00503-wEcosystems1432-9840
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Herrmann, Valentine, Cass, Wendy B., Williams, Alan B., Paull, Stephen J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B., Helcoski, Ryan, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., Cosma, Christopher T., Ferson, Abigail E., Kittle, Caroline, Meakem, Victoria, McGregor, Ian R., Prestipino, Maya N., Scott, Michael K., Terrell, Alyssa R., Alonso, Alfonso, Dallmeier, Francisco, and McShea, William J. 2020. "Long-Term Impacts of Invasive Insects and Pathogens on Composition, Biomass, and Diversity of Forests in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains." Ecosystems https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-020-00503-w
ID: 155476
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Herrmann, Valentine; Cass, Wendy B.; Williams, Alan B.; Paull, Stephen J.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B.; Helcoski, Ryan; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Cosma, Christopher T.; Ferson, Abigail E.; Kittle, Caroline; Meakem, Victoria; McGregor, Ian R.; Prestipino, Maya N.; Scott, Michael K.; Terrell, Alyssa R.; Alonso, Alfonso; Dallmeier, Francisco; McShea, William J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Abstract: Exotic forest insects and pathogens (EFIP) have become regular features of temperate forest ecosystems, yet we lack a long-term perspective on their net impacts on tree mortality, carbon sequestration, and tree species diversity. Here, we analyze 3 decades (1987-2019) of forest monitoring data from the Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregion in eastern North America, including 67 plots totaling 29.4 ha, along with a historical survey from 1939. Over the past century, EFIP substantially affected at least eight tree genera. Tree host taxa had anomalously high mortality rates (>= 6% year(-1) from 2008 to 2019 vs 1.4% year(-1) for less-impacted taxa). Following the arrival of EFIP, affected taxa declined in abundance (- 25 to - 100%) and live aboveground biomass (AGB; - 13 to - 100%) within our monitoring plots. We estimate that EFIP were responsible for 21-29% of ecosystem AGB loss through mortality (- 87 g m(-2) year(-1)) from 1991 to 2013 across 66 sites. Over a century, net AGB loss among affected species totaled roughly 6.6-10 kg m(-2). The affected host taxa accounted for 23-29% of genera losses at the plot scale, with mixed net effects on alpha-diversity. Several taxa were lost from our monitoring plots but not completely extirpated from the region. Despite these losses, both total AGB and alpha-diversity were largely recovered through increases in sympatric genera. These results indicate that EFIP have been an important force shaping forest composition, carbon cycling, and diversity. At the same time, less-affected taxa in these relatively diverse temperate forests have conferred substantial resilience with regard to biomass and alpha-diversity.
Management Regime and Field Age Affect Species Richness and Cover of Native Forbs and Exotic Species in Virginia GrasslandsLedvina, JosephMcShea, William J.Bourg, Norman A.Herrmann, ValentineAkre, ThomasJohnson, Amy E. M.2020DOI: info:10.3368/er.38.2.83Ecological Restorationv. 38No. 2839383–931543-4060
Ledvina, Joseph, McShea, William J., Bourg, Norman A., Herrmann, Valentine, Akre, Thomas, and Johnson, Amy E. M. 2020. "Management Regime and Field Age Affect Species Richness and Cover of Native Forbs and Exotic Species in Virginia Grasslands." Ecological Restoration 38 (2):83–93. https://doi.org/10.3368/er.38.2.83
ID: 155892
Type: article
Authors: Ledvina, Joseph; McShea, William J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Herrmann, Valentine; Akre, Thomas; Johnson, Amy E. M.
Keywords: NZP
Abstract: The majority of grasslands in the eastern United States are maintained through agricultural use (livestock grazing and hay production), intermittent management as fallow fields, or active management for ecological or recreational purposes. Management following agricultural use can follow a variety of practices from benign neglect to active planting of native grasses and forbs. We surveyed 64 grasslands in a 15-county region of northwestern Virginia to assess their plant species composition, with emphasis on the response of exotic species and native forb species richness to time since agricultural use. With regard to agricultural use, we found that livestock grazing resulted in low levels of native species richness and increased exotic species prevalence, while hay production increased native forb richness. In these fields, eutrophication (as measured by phosphorus levels) was a strong positive predictor of exotic species. Post-agricultural fields, maintained through mowing (fallow), retained native species but also experienced sharp increases in exotic species. When post-agricultural management included the establishment of native grasses and forbs, a higher initial richness of native species resulted. However, fields disked during establishment lost native species and gained exotic species with increasing field age; an outcome not observed when field establishment did not involve disking. The management practices applied to post-agricultural fields significantly impact their ability to support biodiversity, their propensity to harbor exotic species, and their ability to maintain native diversity and resist invasions of exotic species with increasing age since abandonment.
Tree height and leaf drought tolerance traits shape growth responses across droughts in a temperate broadleaf forestMcGregor, Ian R.Helcoski, RyanKunert, NorbertTepley, Alan J.Gonzalez‐Akre, Erika B.Herrmann, ValentineZailaa, JosephStovall, Atticus E. L.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Pederson, NeilSack, LawrenAnderson‐Teixeira, Kristina J.2020DOI: info:10.1111/nph.16996New Phytologist0028-646X
McGregor, Ian R., Helcoski, Ryan, Kunert, Norbert, Tepley, Alan J., Gonzalez‐Akre, Erika B., Herrmann, Valentine, Zailaa, Joseph, Stovall, Atticus E. L., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Pederson, Neil, Sack, Lawren, and Anderson‐Teixeira, Kristina J. 2020. "Tree height and leaf drought tolerance traits shape growth responses across droughts in a temperate broadleaf forest." New Phytologist https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.16996
ID: 157275
Type: article
Authors: McGregor, Ian R.; Helcoski, Ryan; Kunert, Norbert; Tepley, Alan J.; Gonzalez‐Akre, Erika B.; Herrmann, Valentine; Zailaa, Joseph; Stovall, Atticus E. L.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Pederson, Neil; Sack, Lawren; Anderson‐Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Direct and indirect effects of climate on richness drive the latitudinal diversity gradient in forest treesChu, ChengjinLutz, James A.Kral, KamilVrska, TomasYin, XueMyers, Jonathan A.Abiem, IverenAlonso, AlfonsoBourg, NormBurslem, David F. R. P.Cao, MinChapman, HazelCondit, Richard S.Fang, SuqinFischer, Gunter A.Gao, LianmingHao, ZhanqinHau, Billy C. H.He, QingHector, AndrewHubbell, Stephen P.Jiang, MingxiJin, GuangzeKenfack, DavidLai, JiangshanLi, BuhangLi, XiankunLi, YideLian, JuyuLin, LuxiangLiu, YankunLiu, YuLuo, YahuangMa, KepingMcShea, WilliamMemiaghe, HerveMi, XiangchengNi, MingO'Brien, Michael J.de Oliveira, Alexandre A.Orwig, David A.Parker, Geoffrey G.Qiao, XiujuanRen, HaibaoReynolds, GlenSang, WeiguoShen, GuochunSu, ZhiyaoSui, XinghuaSun, I-FangTian, SongyanWang, BinWang, XihuaWang, XugaoWang, YoushiWeiblen, George D.Wen, ShujunXi, NianxunXiang, WushengXu, HanXu, KunYe, WanhuiZhang, BingweiZhang, JiaxinZhang, XiaotongZhang, YingmingZhu, KaiZimmerman, JessStorch, DavidBaltzer, Jennifer L.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Mittelbach, Gary G.He, Fangliang2019DOI: info:10.1111/ele.13175Ecology Lettersv. 22No. 2245255245–2551461-023X
Chu, Chengjin, Lutz, James A., Kral, Kamil, Vrska, Tomas, Yin, Xue, Myers, Jonathan A., Abiem, Iveren, Alonso, Alfonso, Bourg, Norm, Burslem, David F. R. P., Cao, Min, Chapman, Hazel, Condit, Richard S., Fang, Suqin, Fischer, Gunter A., Gao, Lianming, Hao, Zhanqin, Hau, Billy C. H., He, Qing, Hector, Andrew, Hubbell, Stephen P., Jiang, Mingxi, Jin, Guangze, Kenfack, David, Lai, Jiangshan et al. 2019. "Direct and indirect effects of climate on richness drive the latitudinal diversity gradient in forest trees." Ecology Letters 22 (2):245–255. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13175
ID: 149947
Type: article
Authors: Chu, Chengjin; Lutz, James A.; Kral, Kamil; Vrska, Tomas; Yin, Xue; Myers, Jonathan A.; Abiem, Iveren; Alonso, Alfonso; Bourg, Norm; Burslem, David F. R. P.; Cao, Min; Chapman, Hazel; Condit, Richard S.; Fang, Suqin; Fischer, Gunter A.; Gao, Lianming; Hao, Zhanqin; Hau, Billy C. H.; He, Qing; Hector, Andrew; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Jiang, Mingxi; Jin, Guangze; Kenfack, David; Lai, Jiangshan; Li, Buhang; Li, Xiankun; Li, Yide; Lian, Juyu; Lin, Luxiang; Liu, Yankun; Liu, Yu; Luo, Yahuang; Ma, Keping; McShea, William; Memiaghe, Herve; Mi, Xiangcheng; Ni, Ming; O'Brien, Michael J.; de Oliveira, Alexandre A.; Orwig, David A.; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Qiao, Xiujuan; Ren, Haibao; Reynolds, Glen; Sang, Weiguo; Shen, Guochun; Su, Zhiyao; Sui, Xinghua; Sun, I-Fang; Tian, Songyan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Xihua; Wang, Xugao; Wang, Youshi; Weiblen, George D.; Wen, Shujun; Xi, Nianxun; Xiang, Wusheng; Xu, Han; Xu, Kun; Ye, Wanhui; Zhang, Bingwei; Zhang, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Yingming; Zhu, Kai; Zimmerman, Jess; Storch, David; Baltzer, Jennifer L.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Mittelbach, Gary G.; He, Fangliang
Keywords: NZP; STRI; SERC; NMNH; NH-Botany
Abstract: Climate is widely recognised as an important determinant of the latitudinal diversity gradient. However, most existing studies make no distinction between direct and indirect effects of climate, which substantially hinders our understanding of how climate constrains biodiversity globally. Using data from 35 large forest plots, we test hypothesised relationships amongst climate, topography, forest structural attributes (stem abundance, tree size variation and stand basal area) and tree species richness to better understand drivers of latitudinal tree diversity patterns. Climate influences tree richness both directly, with more species in warm, moist, aseasonal climates and indirectly, with more species at higher stem abundance. These results imply direct limitation of species diversity by climatic stress and more rapid (co-)evolution and narrower niche partitioning in warm climates. They also support the idea that increased numbers of individuals associated with high primary productivity are partitioned to support a greater number of species.
Temporal population variability in local forest communities has mixed effects on tree species richness across a latitudinal gradientFung, TakChisholm, Ryan A.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Bourg, NormBrockelman, Warren Y.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhChang‐Yang, Chia-HaoChitra‐Tarak, RutujaChuyong, GeorgeCondit, RichardDattaraja, Handanakere S.Davies, Stuart J.Ewango, Corneille E. N.Fewless, GaryFletcher, ChristineGunatilleke, C. V. S.Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N.Hao, ZhanqingHogan, J. A.Howe, RobertHsieh, Chang-FuKenfack, DavidLin, YichingMa, KepingMakana, Jean-RemyMcMahon, SeanMcShea, William J.Mi, XiangchengNathalang, AnuttaraOng, Perry S.Parker, GeoffreyRau, E. -PShue, JessicaSu, Sheng-HsinSukumar, RamanSun, I. -FSuresh, Hebbalalu S.Tan, SylvesterThomas, DuncanThompson, JillValencia, RenatoVallejo, Martha I.Wang, XugaoWang, YunquanWijekoon, PushpaWolf, AmyYap, SandraZimmerman, Jess2019DOI: info:10.1111/ele.13412Ecology Letters1121–121461-023X
Fung, Tak, Chisholm, Ryan A., Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Bourg, Norm, Brockelman, Warren Y., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Chang‐Yang, Chia-Hao, Chitra‐Tarak, Rutuja, Chuyong, George, Condit, Richard, Dattaraja, Handanakere S., Davies, Stuart J., Ewango, Corneille E. N., Fewless, Gary, Fletcher, Christine, Gunatilleke, C. V. S., Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N., Hao, Zhanqing, Hogan, J. A., Howe, Robert, Hsieh, Chang-Fu, Kenfack, David, Lin, Yiching, Ma, Keping, Makana, Jean-Remy et al. 2019. "Temporal population variability in local forest communities has mixed effects on tree species richness across a latitudinal gradient." Ecology Letters 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13412
ID: 153274
Type: article
Authors: Fung, Tak; Chisholm, Ryan A.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Bourg, Norm; Brockelman, Warren Y.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Chang‐Yang, Chia-Hao; Chitra‐Tarak, Rutuja; Chuyong, George; Condit, Richard; Dattaraja, Handanakere S.; Davies, Stuart J.; Ewango, Corneille E. N.; Fewless, Gary; Fletcher, Christine; Gunatilleke, C. V. S.; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N.; Hao, Zhanqing; Hogan, J. A.; Howe, Robert; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Kenfack, David; Lin, Yiching; Ma, Keping; Makana, Jean-Remy; McMahon, Sean; McShea, William J.; Mi, Xiangcheng; Nathalang, Anuttara; Ong, Perry S.; Parker, Geoffrey; Rau, E. -P; Shue, Jessica; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Sukumar, Raman; Sun, I. -F; Suresh, Hebbalalu S.; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Duncan; Thompson, Jill; Valencia, Renato; Vallejo, Martha I.; Wang, Xugao; Wang, Yunquan; Wijekoon, Pushpa; Wolf, Amy; Yap, Sandra; Zimmerman, Jess
Keywords: STRI; SERC; NZP
Abstract: Among the local processes that determine species diversity in ecological communities, fluctuation-dependent mechanisms that are mediated by temporal variability in the abundances of species populations have received significant attention. Higher temporal variability in the abundances of species populations can increase the strength of temporal niche partitioning but can also increase the risk of species extinctions, such that the net effect on species coexistence is not clear. We quantified this temporal population variability for tree species in 21 large forest plots and found much greater variability for higher latitude plots with fewer tree species. A fitted mechanistic model showed that among the forest plots, the net effect of temporal population variability on tree species coexistence was usually negative, but sometimes positive or negligible. Therefore, our results suggest that temporal variability in the abundances of species populations has no clear negative or positive contribution to the latitudinal gradient in tree species richness.
Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and AmericaMenge, Duncan N. L.Chisholm, Ryan A.Davies, Stuart J.Salim, Kamariah AbuAllen, DavidAlvarez, MauricioBourg, NormBrockelman, Warren Y.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhButt, NathalieCao, MinChanthorn, WirongChao, Wei-ChunClay, KeithCondit, Richard S.Cordell, Susanda Silva, João BatistaDattaraja, H. S.de Andrade, Ana Cristina SegalinOliveira, Alexandre A. deOuden, Jan denDrescher, MichaelFletcher, ChristineGiardina, Christian P.Gunatilleke, C. V. S.Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N.Hau, Billy C. H.He, FangliangHowe, RobertHsieh, Chang-FuHubbell, Stephen P.Inman‐Narahari, Faith M.Jansen, Patrick A.Johnson, Daniel J.Kong, Lee SingKrál, KamilKu, Chen-ChiaLai, JiangshanLarson, Andrew J.Li, XiankunLi, YideLin, LuxiangLin, YichingLiu, ShirongLum, Shawn K. Y.Lutz, James A.Ma, KepingMalhi, YadvinderMcMahon, SeanMcShea, WilliamMi, XiangchengMorecroft, MichaelMyers, Jonathan A.Nathalang, AnuttaraNovotny, VojtechOng, PerryOrwig, David A.Ostertag, RebeccaParker, Geoffrey G.Phillips, Richard P.Rahman, Kassim AbdSack, LawrenSang, WeiguoShen, GuochunShringi, AnkurShue, JessicaSu, Sheng-HsinSukumar, RamanSun, I. -FSuresh, H. S.Tan, SylvesterThomas, Sean C.Toko, Pagi S.Valencia, RenatoVallejo, Martha I.Vicentini, AlbertoVrška, TomášWang, BinWang, XihuaWeiblen, George D.Wolf, AmyXu, HanYap, SandraZhu, LiFung, Tak2019DOI: info:10.1111/1365-2745.13199Journal of Ecologyv. 107No. 6259826102598–26100022-0477
Menge, Duncan N. L., Chisholm, Ryan A., Davies, Stuart J., Salim, Kamariah Abu, Allen, David, Alvarez, Mauricio, Bourg, Norm, Brockelman, Warren Y., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Butt, Nathalie, Cao, Min, Chanthorn, Wirong, Chao, Wei-Chun, Clay, Keith, Condit, Richard S., Cordell, Susan, da Silva, João Batista, Dattaraja, H. S., de Andrade, Ana Cristina Segalin, Oliveira, Alexandre A. de, Ouden, Jan den, Drescher, Michael, Fletcher, Christine, Giardina, Christian P., Gunatilleke, C. V. S. et al. 2019. "Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and America." Journal of Ecology 107 (6):2598–2610. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13199
ID: 151540
Type: article
Authors: Menge, Duncan N. L.; Chisholm, Ryan A.; Davies, Stuart J.; Salim, Kamariah Abu; Allen, David; Alvarez, Mauricio; Bourg, Norm; Brockelman, Warren Y.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Butt, Nathalie; Cao, Min; Chanthorn, Wirong; Chao, Wei-Chun; Clay, Keith; Condit, Richard S.; Cordell, Susan; da Silva, João Batista; Dattaraja, H. S.; de Andrade, Ana Cristina Segalin; Oliveira, Alexandre A. de; Ouden, Jan den; Drescher, Michael; Fletcher, Christine; Giardina, Christian P.; Gunatilleke, C. V. S.; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. N.; Hau, Billy C. H.; He, Fangliang; Howe, Robert; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Inman‐Narahari, Faith M.; Jansen, Patrick A.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kong, Lee Sing; Král, Kamil; Ku, Chen-Chia; Lai, Jiangshan; Larson, Andrew J.; Li, Xiankun; Li, Yide; Lin, Luxiang; Lin, Yiching; Liu, Shirong; Lum, Shawn K. Y.; Lutz, James A.; Ma, Keping; Malhi, Yadvinder; McMahon, Sean; McShea, William; Mi, Xiangcheng; Morecroft, Michael; Myers, Jonathan A.; Nathalang, Anuttara; Novotny, Vojtech; Ong, Perry; Orwig, David A.; Ostertag, Rebecca; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Phillips, Richard P.; Rahman, Kassim Abd; Sack, Lawren; Sang, Weiguo; Shen, Guochun; Shringi, Ankur; Shue, Jessica; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Sukumar, Raman; Sun, I. -F; Suresh, H. S.; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Sean C.; Toko, Pagi S.; Valencia, Renato; Vallejo, Martha I.; Vicentini, Alberto; Vrška, Tomáš; Wang, Bin; Wang, Xihua; Weiblen, George D.; Wolf, Amy; Xu, Han; Yap, Sandra; Zhu, Li; Fung, Tak
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Symbiotic nitrogen (N)-fixing trees can provide large quantities of new N to ecosystems, but only if they are sufficiently abundant. The overall abundance and latitudinal abundance distributions of N-fixing trees are well characterised in the Americas, but less well outside the Americas. Here, we characterised the abundance of N-fixing trees in a network of forest plots spanning five continents, 5,000 tree species and 4 million trees. The majority of the plots (86%) were in America or Asia. In addition, we examined whether the observed pattern of abundance of N-fixing trees was correlated with mean annual temperature and precipitation. Outside the tropics, N-fixing trees were consistently rare in the forest plots we examined. Within the tropics, N-fixing trees were abundant in American but not Asian forest plots ( 7% versus 1% of basal area and stems). This disparity was not explained by mean annual temperature or precipitation. Our finding of low N-fixing tree abundance in the Asian tropics casts some doubt on recent high estimates of N fixation rates in this region, which do not account for disparities in N-fixing tree abundance between the Asian and American tropics. Synthesis. Inputs of nitrogen to forests depend on symbiotic nitrogen fixation, which is constrained by the abundance of N-fixing trees. By analysing a large dataset of 4 million trees, we found that N-fixing trees were consistently rare in the Asian tropics as well as across higher latitudes in Asia, America and Europe. The rarity of N-fixing trees in the Asian tropics compared with the American tropics might stem from lower intrinsic N limitation in Asian tropical forests, although direct support for any mechanism is lacking. The paucity of N-fixing trees throughout Asian forests suggests that N inputs to the Asian tropics might be lower than previously thought.
Environment- and trait-mediated scaling of tree occupancy in forests worldwideRen, HaibaoKeil, PetrMi, XiangchengMa, KepingHao, ZhanqingYe, WanhuiLin, LuxiangValencia, RenatoFletcher, Christine DawnThomas, Duncan W.Howe, Robert W.Lutz, JamesBourg, Norman A.Su, Sheng-HsinSun, I. F.Zhu, LiChang, Li-WanWang, XihuaDu, XiaojunKenfack, DavidChuyong, George B.Jetz, Walter2019DOI: info:10.1111/geb.12922Global Ecology and Biogeographyv. 28No. 8115511671155–11671466-822X
Ren, Haibao, Keil, Petr, Mi, Xiangcheng, Ma, Keping, Hao, Zhanqing, Ye, Wanhui, Lin, Luxiang, Valencia, Renato, Fletcher, Christine Dawn, Thomas, Duncan W., Howe, Robert W., Lutz, James, Bourg, Norman A., Su, Sheng-Hsin, Sun, I. F., Zhu, Li, Chang, Li-Wan, Wang, Xihua, Du, Xiaojun, Kenfack, David, Chuyong, George B., and Jetz, Walter. 2019. "Environment- and trait-mediated scaling of tree occupancy in forests worldwide." Global Ecology and Biogeography 28 (8):1155–1167. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12922
ID: 151772
Type: article
Authors: Ren, Haibao; Keil, Petr; Mi, Xiangcheng; Ma, Keping; Hao, Zhanqing; Ye, Wanhui; Lin, Luxiang; Valencia, Renato; Fletcher, Christine Dawn; Thomas, Duncan W.; Howe, Robert W.; Lutz, James; Bourg, Norman A.; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Sun, I. F.; Zhu, Li; Chang, Li-Wan; Wang, Xihua; Du, Xiaojun; Kenfack, David; Chuyong, George B.; Jetz, Walter
Keywords: STRI; NZP; NMNH; NH-Botany
A regional assessment of white-tailed deer effects on plant invasionAverill, Kristine M.Mortensen, David A.Smithwick, Erica A. H.Kalisz, SusanMcShea, William J.Bourg, Norman A.Parker, John D.Royo, Alejandro A.Abrams, Marc D.Apsley, David K.Blossey, BerndBoucher, Douglas H.Caraher, Kai L.DiTommaso, AntonioJohnson, Sarah E.Masson, RobertNuzzo, Victoria A.2018DOI: info:10.1093/aobpla/plx047AoB PLANTSv. 10No. 12041-2851
Averill, Kristine M., Mortensen, David A., Smithwick, Erica A. H., Kalisz, Susan, McShea, William J., Bourg, Norman A., Parker, John D., Royo, Alejandro A., Abrams, Marc D., Apsley, David K., Blossey, Bernd, Boucher, Douglas H., Caraher, Kai L., DiTommaso, Antonio, Johnson, Sarah E., Masson, Robert, and Nuzzo, Victoria A. 2018. "A regional assessment of white-tailed deer effects on plant invasion." AoB PLANTS 10 (1):https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plx047
ID: 145166
Type: article
Authors: Averill, Kristine M.; Mortensen, David A.; Smithwick, Erica A. H.; Kalisz, Susan; McShea, William J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Parker, John D.; Royo, Alejandro A.; Abrams, Marc D.; Apsley, David K.; Blossey, Bernd; Boucher, Douglas H.; Caraher, Kai L.; DiTommaso, Antonio; Johnson, Sarah E.; Masson, Robert; Nuzzo, Victoria A.
Keywords: NZP; SERC
Abstract: Herbivores can profoundly influence plant species assembly, including plant invasion, and resulting community composition. Population increases of native herbivores, e.g. white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), combined with burgeoning plant invasions raise concerns for native plant diversity and forest regeneration. While individual researchers typically test for the impact of deer on plant invasion at a few sites, the overarching influence of deer on plant invasion across regional scales is unclear. We tested the effects of deer on the abundance and diversity of introduced and native herbaceous and woody plants across 23 white-tailed deer research sites distributed across the east-central and north-eastern USA and representing a wide range of deer densities and invasive plant abundance and identity. Deer access/exclusion or deer population density did not affect introduced plant richness or community-level abundance. Native and total plant species richness, abundance (cover and stem density) and Shannon diversity were lower in deer-access vs. deer-exclusion plots. Among deer-access plots, native species richness, native and total cover, and Shannon diversity (cover) declined as deer density increased. Deer access increased the proportion of introduced species cover (but not of species richness or stem density). As deer density increased, the proportion of introduced species richness, cover and stem density all increased. Because absolute abundance of introduced plants was unaffected by deer, the increase in proportion of introduced plant abundance is likely an indirect effect of deer reducing native cover. Indicator species analysis revealed that deer access favoured three introduced plant species, including Alliaria petiolata and Microstegium vimineum, as well as four native plant species. In contrast, deer exclusion favoured three introduced plant species, including Lonicera japonica and Rosa multiflora, and 15 native plant species. Overall, native deer reduced community diversity, lowering native plant richness and abundance, and benefited certain invasive plants, suggesting pervasive impacts of this keystone herbivore on plant community composition and ecosystem services in native forests across broad swathes of the eastern USA.
Response to Comment on 'Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale'LaManna, Joseph A.Mangan, Scott A.Alonso, AlfonsoBourg, Norman A.Brockelman, Warren Y.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhChang, Li-WanChiang, Jyh-MinChuyong, George B.Clay, KeithCordell, SusanDavies, Stuart J.Furniss, Tucker J.Giardina, Christian P.Gunatilleke, I. A. U. NimalGunatilleke, C. V. SavitriHe, FangliangHowe, Robert W.Hubbell, Stephen P.Hsieh, Chang-FuInman-Narahari, Faith M.Janik, DavidJohnson, Daniel J.Kenfack, DavidKorte, LisaKral, KamilLarson, Andrew J.Lutz, James A.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.Memiaghe, Herve R.Nathalang, AnuttaraNovotny, VojtechOng, Perry S.Orwig, David A.Ostertag, RebeccaParker, Geoffrey G.Phillips, Richard P.Sack, LawrenSun, I-FangTello, J. SebastianThomas, Duncan W.Turner, Benjamin L.Diaz, Dilys M. VelaVrska, TomasWeiblen, George D.Wolf, AmyYap, SandraMyers, Jonathan A.2018DOI: info:10.1126/science.aar3824Sciencev. 360No. 6391aar3824aar3824aar3824–aar38240036-8075
LaManna, Joseph A., Mangan, Scott A., Alonso, Alfonso, Bourg, Norman A., Brockelman, Warren Y., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Chang, Li-Wan, Chiang, Jyh-Min, Chuyong, George B., Clay, Keith, Cordell, Susan, Davies, Stuart J., Furniss, Tucker J., Giardina, Christian P., Gunatilleke, I. A. U. Nimal, Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri, He, Fangliang, Howe, Robert W., Hubbell, Stephen P., Hsieh, Chang-Fu, Inman-Narahari, Faith M., Janik, David, Johnson, Daniel J., Kenfack, David, Korte, Lisa et al. 2018. "Response to Comment on "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale"." Science 360 (6391):aar3824–aar3824. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aar3824
ID: 146551
Type: article
Authors: LaManna, Joseph A.; Mangan, Scott A.; Alonso, Alfonso; Bourg, Norman A.; Brockelman, Warren Y.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Chang, Li-Wan; Chiang, Jyh-Min; Chuyong, George B.; Clay, Keith; Cordell, Susan; Davies, Stuart J.; Furniss, Tucker J.; Giardina, Christian P.; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. Nimal; Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri; He, Fangliang; Howe, Robert W.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Inman-Narahari, Faith M.; Janik, David; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kenfack, David; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Larson, Andrew J.; Lutz, James A.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.; Memiaghe, Herve R.; Nathalang, Anuttara; Novotny, Vojtech; Ong, Perry S.; Orwig, David A.; Ostertag, Rebecca; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Phillips, Richard P.; Sack, Lawren; Sun, I-Fang; Tello, J. Sebastian; Thomas, Duncan W.; Turner, Benjamin L.; Diaz, Dilys M. Vela; Vrska, Tomas; Weiblen, George D.; Wolf, Amy; Yap, Sandra; Myers, Jonathan A.
Keywords: STRI; NZP; SERC; NMNH; NH-Botany
Abstract: Hulsmann and Hartig suggest that ecological mechanisms other than specialized natural enemies or intraspecific competition contribute to our estimates of conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). To address their concern, we show that our results are not the result of amethodological artifact and present a null-model analysis that demonstrates that our original findings-(i) stronger CNDD at tropical relative to temperate latitudes and (ii) a latitudinal shift in the relationship between CNDD and species abundance-persist even after controlling for other processes that might influence spatial relationships between adults and recruits.
Response to Comment on 'Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale'LaManna, Joseph A.Mangan, Scott A.Alonso, AlfonsoBourg, Norman A.Brockelman, Warren Y.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhChang, Li-WanChiang, Jyh-MinChuyong, George B.Clay, KeithCordell, SusanDavies, Stuart J.Furniss, Tucker J.Giardina, Christian P.Gunatilleke, I. A. U. NimalGunatilleke, C. V. SavitriHe, FangliangHowe, Robert W.Hubbell, Stephen P.Hsieh, Chang-FuInman-Narahari, Faith M.Janik, DavidJohnson, Daniel J.Kenfack, DavidKorte, LisaKral, KamilLarson, Andrew J.Lutz, James A.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.Memiaghe, Herve R.Nathalang, AnuttaraNovotny, VojtechOng, Perry S.Orwig, David A.Ostertag, RebeccaParker, Geoffrey G.Phillips, Richard P.Sack, LawrenSun, I-FangTello, J. SebastianThomas, Duncan W.Turner, Benjamin L.Diaz, Dilys M. VelaVrska, TomasWeiblen, George D.Wolf, AmyYap, SandraMyers, Jonathan A.2018DOI: info:10.1126/science.aar5245Sciencev. 360No. 63910036-8075
LaManna, Joseph A., Mangan, Scott A., Alonso, Alfonso, Bourg, Norman A., Brockelman, Warren Y., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Chang, Li-Wan, Chiang, Jyh-Min, Chuyong, George B., Clay, Keith, Cordell, Susan, Davies, Stuart J., Furniss, Tucker J., Giardina, Christian P., Gunatilleke, I. A. U. Nimal, Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri, He, Fangliang, Howe, Robert W., Hubbell, Stephen P., Hsieh, Chang-Fu, Inman-Narahari, Faith M., Janik, David, Johnson, Daniel J., Kenfack, David, Korte, Lisa et al. 2018. "Response to Comment on "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale"." Science 360 (6391):https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aar5245
ID: 146550
Type: article
Authors: LaManna, Joseph A.; Mangan, Scott A.; Alonso, Alfonso; Bourg, Norman A.; Brockelman, Warren Y.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Chang, Li-Wan; Chiang, Jyh-Min; Chuyong, George B.; Clay, Keith; Cordell, Susan; Davies, Stuart J.; Furniss, Tucker J.; Giardina, Christian P.; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. Nimal; Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri; He, Fangliang; Howe, Robert W.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Inman-Narahari, Faith M.; Janik, David; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kenfack, David; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Larson, Andrew J.; Lutz, James A.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.; Memiaghe, Herve R.; Nathalang, Anuttara; Novotny, Vojtech; Ong, Perry S.; Orwig, David A.; Ostertag, Rebecca; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Phillips, Richard P.; Sack, Lawren; Sun, I-Fang; Tello, J. Sebastian; Thomas, Duncan W.; Turner, Benjamin L.; Diaz, Dilys M. Vela; Vrska, Tomas; Weiblen, George D.; Wolf, Amy; Yap, Sandra; Myers, Jonathan A.
Keywords: NZP; SERC; STRI; NMNH; NH-Botany
Abstract: Chisholm and Fung claim that our method of estimating conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD) in recruitment is systematically biased, and present an alternative method that shows no latitudinal pattern in CNDD. We demonstrate that their approach produces strongly biased estimates of CNDD, explaining why they do not detect a latitudinal pattern. We also address their methodological concerns using an alternative distance-weighted approach, which supports our original findings of a latitudinal gradient in CNDD and a latitudinal shift in the relationship between CNDD and species abundance.
Global importance of large-diameter treesLutz, James A.Furniss, Tucker J.Johnson, Daniel J.Davies, Stuart J.Allen, DavidAlonso, AlfonsoAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Andrade, AnaBaltzer, JenniferBecker, Kendall M. L.Blomdahl, Erika M.Bourg, Norman A.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhBurslem, David F. R. P.Cansler, C. AlinaCao, KeCao, MinCardenas, DaironChang, Li-WanChao, Kuo-JungChao, Wei-ChunChiang, Jyh-MinChu, ChengjinChuyong, George B.Clay, KeithCondit, Richard S.Cordell, SusanDattaraja, Handanakere S.Duque, AlvaroEwango, Corneille E. N.Fischer, Gunter A.Fletcher, ChristineFreund, James A.Giardina, ChristianGermain, Sara J.Gilbert, Gregory S.Hao, ZhanqingHart, TereseHau, Billy C. H.He, FangliangHector, AndrewHowe, Robert W.Hsieh, Chang-FuHu, Yue-HuaHubbell, Stephen P.Inman-Narahari, Faith M.Itoh, AkiraJanik, DavidKassim, Abdul RahmanKenfack, DavidKorte, LisaKral, KamilLarson, Andrew J.Li, YideLin, YichingLiu, ShirongLum, ShawnMa, KepingMakana, Jean-RemyMalhi, YadvinderMcMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.Memiaghe, Herve R.Mi, XiangchengMorecroft, MichaelMusili, Paul M.Myers, Jonathan A.Novotny, Vojtechde Oliveira, AlexandreOng, PerryOrwig, David A.Ostertag, RebeccaParker, Geoffrey G.Patankar, RajitPhillips, Richard P.Reynolds, GlenSack, LawrenSong, Guo-Zhang M.Su, Sheng-HsinSukumar, RamanSun, I-FangSuresh, Hebbalalu S.Swanson, Mark E.Tan, SylvesterThomas, Duncan W.Thompson, JillUriarte, MariaValencia, RenatoVicentini, AlbertoVrska, TomasWang, XugaoWeiblen, George D.Wolf, AmyWu, Shu-HuiXu, HanYamakura, TakuoYap, SandraZimmerman, Jess K.2018DOI: info:10.1111/geb.12747Global Ecology and Biogeographyv. 27No. 7849864849–8641466-822X
Lutz, James A., Furniss, Tucker J., Johnson, Daniel J., Davies, Stuart J., Allen, David, Alonso, Alfonso, Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Andrade, Ana, Baltzer, Jennifer, Becker, Kendall M. L., Blomdahl, Erika M., Bourg, Norman A., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Burslem, David F. R. P., Cansler, C. Alina, Cao, Ke, Cao, Min, Cardenas, Dairon, Chang, Li-Wan, Chao, Kuo-Jung, Chao, Wei-Chun, Chiang, Jyh-Min, Chu, Chengjin, Chuyong, George B., Clay, Keith et al. 2018. "Global importance of large-diameter trees." Global Ecology and Biogeography 27 (7):849–864. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12747
ID: 148014
Type: article
Authors: Lutz, James A.; Furniss, Tucker J.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Davies, Stuart J.; Allen, David; Alonso, Alfonso; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Andrade, Ana; Baltzer, Jennifer; Becker, Kendall M. L.; Blomdahl, Erika M.; Bourg, Norman A.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Burslem, David F. R. P.; Cansler, C. Alina; Cao, Ke; Cao, Min; Cardenas, Dairon; Chang, Li-Wan; Chao, Kuo-Jung; Chao, Wei-Chun; Chiang, Jyh-Min; Chu, Chengjin; Chuyong, George B.; Clay, Keith; Condit, Richard S.; Cordell, Susan; Dattaraja, Handanakere S.; Duque, Alvaro; Ewango, Corneille E. N.; Fischer, Gunter A.; Fletcher, Christine; Freund, James A.; Giardina, Christian; Germain, Sara J.; Gilbert, Gregory S.; Hao, Zhanqing; Hart, Terese; Hau, Billy C. H.; He, Fangliang; Hector, Andrew; Howe, Robert W.; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Hu, Yue-Hua; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Inman-Narahari, Faith M.; Itoh, Akira; Janik, David; Kassim, Abdul Rahman; Kenfack, David; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Larson, Andrew J.; Li, Yide; Lin, Yiching; Liu, Shirong; Lum, Shawn; Ma, Keping; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.; Memiaghe, Herve R.; Mi, Xiangcheng; Morecroft, Michael; Musili, Paul M.; Myers, Jonathan A.; Novotny, Vojtech; de Oliveira, Alexandre; Ong, Perry; Orwig, David A.; Ostertag, Rebecca; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Patankar, Rajit; Phillips, Richard P.; Reynolds, Glen; Sack, Lawren; Song, Guo-Zhang M.; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Sukumar, Raman; Sun, I-Fang; Suresh, Hebbalalu S.; Swanson, Mark E.; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Duncan W.; Thompson, Jill; Uriarte, Maria; Valencia, Renato; Vicentini, Alberto; Vrska, Tomas; Wang, Xugao; Weiblen, George D.; Wolf, Amy; Wu, Shu-Hui; Xu, Han; Yamakura, Takuo; Yap, Sandra; Zimmerman, Jess K.
Keywords: NMNH; NH-Botany; STRI; NZP
Abstract: Aim: To examine the contribution of large-diameter trees to biomass, stand structure, and species richness across forest biomes. Location: Global. Time period: Early 21st century. Major taxa studied: Woody plants. Methods: We examined the contribution of large trees to forest density, richness and biomass using a global network of 48 large (from 2 to 60 ha) forest plots representing 5,601,473 stems across 9,298 species and 210 plant families. This contribution was assessed using three metrics: the largest 1% of trees >= 1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), all trees >= 60 cm DBH, and those rank-ordered largest trees that cumulatively comprise 50% of forest biomass. Results: Averaged across these 48 forest plots, the largest 1% of trees >= 1 cm DBH comprised 50% of aboveground live biomass, with hectare-scale standard deviation of 26%. Trees >= 60 cm DBH comprised 41% of aboveground live tree biomass. The size of the largest trees correlated with total forest biomass (r(2) 5.62, p < .001). Large-diameter trees in high biomass forests represented far fewer species relative to overall forest richness (r(2) = 5.45, p < .001). Forests with more diverse large-diameter tree communities were comprised of smaller trees (r(2) = 5.33, p < .001). Lower large-diameter richness was associated with large-diameter trees being individuals of more common species (r(2) =5.17, p=5.002). The concentration of biomass in the largest 1% of trees declined with increasing absolute latitude (r(2) = 5.46, p < .001), as did forest density (r(2) = 5.31, p < .001). Forest structural complexity increased with increasing absolute latitude (r(2) = 5.26, p < .001). Main conclusions: Because large-diameter trees constitute roughly half of the mature forest biomass worldwide, their dynamics and sensitivities to environmental change represent potentially large controls on global forest carbon cycling. We recommend managing forests for conservation of existing large-diameter trees or those that can soon reach large diameters as a simple way to conserve and potentially enhance ecosystem services.
Ecological drivers of spatial community dissimilarity, species replacement and species nestedness across temperate forestsWang, XugaoWiegand, ThorstenAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Bourg, Norman A.Hao, ZhanqingHowe, RobertJin, GuangzeOrwig, David A.Spasojevic, Marko J.Wang, ShunzhongWolf, AmyMyers, Jonathan A.2018DOI: info:10.1111/geb.12719Global Ecology and Biogeographyv. 27No. 5581592581–5921466-822X
Wang, Xugao, Wiegand, Thorsten, Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Bourg, Norman A., Hao, Zhanqing, Howe, Robert, Jin, Guangze, Orwig, David A., Spasojevic, Marko J., Wang, Shunzhong, Wolf, Amy, and Myers, Jonathan A. 2018. "Ecological drivers of spatial community dissimilarity, species replacement and species nestedness across temperate forests." Global Ecology and Biogeography 27 (5):581–592. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12719
ID: 145552
Type: article
Authors: Wang, Xugao; Wiegand, Thorsten; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Hao, Zhanqing; Howe, Robert; Jin, Guangze; Orwig, David A.; Spasojevic, Marko J.; Wang, Shunzhong; Wolf, Amy; Myers, Jonathan A.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Interactive effects of deer exclusion and exotic plant removal on deciduous forest understory communitiesBourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Herrmann, ValentineStewart, Chad M.2017DOI: info:10.1093/aobpla/plx046AoB PLANTSv. 9No. 52041-2851
Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Herrmann, Valentine, and Stewart, Chad M. 2017. "Interactive effects of deer exclusion and exotic plant removal on deciduous forest understory communities." AoB PLANTS 9 (5):https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plx046
ID: 148228
Type: article
Authors: Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Herrmann, Valentine; Stewart, Chad M.
Keywords: NZP
Reconstructing a herbivore's diet using a novel rbcL DNA mini-barcode for plantsErickson, David L.Reed, ElizabethRamachandran, PadminiBourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Ottesen, Andrea2017DOI: info:10.1093/aobpla/plx015AoB PLANTSv. 9No. 32041-2851
Erickson, David L., Reed, Elizabeth, Ramachandran, Padmini, Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., and Ottesen, Andrea. 2017. "Reconstructing a herbivore's diet using a novel rbcL DNA mini-barcode for plants." AoB PLANTS 9 (3):https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plx015
ID: 143013
Type: article
Authors: Erickson, David L.; Reed, Elizabeth; Ramachandran, Padmini; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Ottesen, Andrea
Keywords: NZP
Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plotGonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaEng, Cheng-YinTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Davies, Stuart J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2017DOI: info:10.5479/data_scbi/10088/31954Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Eng, Cheng-Yin, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Davies, Stuart J., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2017. [Dataset] "Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot." Distributed by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. https://doi.org/10.5479/data_scbi/10088/31954
ID: 143607
Type: dataset
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Eng, Cheng-Yin; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Davies, Stuart J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: STRI; Dataset; NZP
Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scaleLaManna, Joseph A.Mangan, Scott A.Alonso, AlfonsoBourg, Norman A.Brockelman, Warren Y.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhChang, Li-WanChiang, Jyh-MinChuyong, George B.Clay, KeithCondit, Richard S.Cordell, SusanDavies, Stuart J.Furniss, Tucker J.Giardina, Christian P.Gunatilleke, I. A. U. NimalGunatilleke, C. V. SavitriHe, FangliangHowe, Robert W.Hubbell, Stephen P.Hsieh, Chang-FuInman-Narahari, Faith M.Janik, DavidJohnson, Daniel J.Kenfack, DavidKorte, LisaKral, KamilLarson, Andrew J.Lutz, James A.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.Memiaghe, Herve R.Nathalang, AnuttaraNovotny, VojtechOng, Perry S.Orwig, David A.Ostertag, RebeccaParker, Geoffrey G.Phillips, Richard P.Sack, LawrenSun, I-FangTello, J. SebastianThomas, Duncan W.Turner, Benjamin L.Diaz, Dilys M. VelaVrska, TomasWeiblen, George D.Wolf, AmyYap, SandraMyers, Jonathan A.2017DOI: info:10.1126/science.aam5678Sciencev. 356No. 6345138913921389–13920036-8075
LaManna, Joseph A., Mangan, Scott A., Alonso, Alfonso, Bourg, Norman A., Brockelman, Warren Y., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Chang, Li-Wan, Chiang, Jyh-Min, Chuyong, George B., Clay, Keith, Condit, Richard S., Cordell, Susan, Davies, Stuart J., Furniss, Tucker J., Giardina, Christian P., Gunatilleke, I. A. U. Nimal, Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri, He, Fangliang, Howe, Robert W., Hubbell, Stephen P., Hsieh, Chang-Fu, Inman-Narahari, Faith M., Janik, David, Johnson, Daniel J., Kenfack, David et al. 2017. "Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale." Science 356 (6345):1389–1392. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aam5678
ID: 143145
Type: article
Authors: LaManna, Joseph A.; Mangan, Scott A.; Alonso, Alfonso; Bourg, Norman A.; Brockelman, Warren Y.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Chang, Li-Wan; Chiang, Jyh-Min; Chuyong, George B.; Clay, Keith; Condit, Richard S.; Cordell, Susan; Davies, Stuart J.; Furniss, Tucker J.; Giardina, Christian P.; Gunatilleke, I. A. U. Nimal; Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri; He, Fangliang; Howe, Robert W.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Inman-Narahari, Faith M.; Janik, David; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kenfack, David; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Larson, Andrew J.; Lutz, James A.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.; Memiaghe, Herve R.; Nathalang, Anuttara; Novotny, Vojtech; Ong, Perry S.; Orwig, David A.; Ostertag, Rebecca; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Phillips, Richard P.; Sack, Lawren; Sun, I-Fang; Tello, J. Sebastian; Thomas, Duncan W.; Turner, Benjamin L.; Diaz, Dilys M. Vela; Vrska, Tomas; Weiblen, George D.; Wolf, Amy; Yap, Sandra; Myers, Jonathan A.
Keywords: NZP; STRI; NMNH; NH-Botany; SERC
Abstract: Theory predicts that higher biodiversity in the tropics is maintained by specialized interactions among plants and their natural enemies that result in conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). By using more than 3000 species and nearly 2.4 million trees across 24 forest plots worldwide, we show that global patterns in tree species diversity reflect not only stronger CNDD at tropical versus temperate latitudes but also a latitudinal shift in the relationship between CNDD and species abundance. CNDD was stronger for rare species at tropical versus temperate latitudes, potentially causing the persistence of greater numbers of rare species in the tropics. Our study reveals fundamental differences in the nature of local-scale biotic interactions that contribute to the maintenance of species diversity across temperate and tropical communities.
Sapling growth rates reveal conspecific negative density dependence in a temperate forestRamage, Benjamin S.Johnson, Daniel J.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaMcShea, William J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Bourg, Norman A.Clay, Keith2017DOI: info:10.1002/ece3.3298Ecology and Evolutionv. 7No. 19766176717661–76712045-7758
Ramage, Benjamin S., Johnson, Daniel J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, McShea, William J., Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Bourg, Norman A., and Clay, Keith. 2017. "Sapling growth rates reveal conspecific negative density dependence in a temperate forest." Ecology and Evolution 7 (19):7661–7671. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3298
ID: 143756
Type: article
Authors: Ramage, Benjamin S.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; McShea, William J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Clay, Keith
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Tree-mycorrhizal associations detected remotely from canopy spectral propertiesFisher, Joshua B.Sweeney, SeanBrzostek, Edward R.Evans, Tom P.Johnson, Daniel J.Myers, Jonathan A.Bourg, Norman A.Wolf, Amy T.Howe, Robert W.Phillips, Richard P.2016DOI: info:10.1111/gcb.13264Global Change Biologyv. 22No. 7259626072596–26071354-1013
Fisher, Joshua B., Sweeney, Sean, Brzostek, Edward R., Evans, Tom P., Johnson, Daniel J., Myers, Jonathan A., Bourg, Norman A., Wolf, Amy T., Howe, Robert W., and Phillips, Richard P. 2016. "Tree-mycorrhizal associations detected remotely from canopy spectral properties." Global Change Biology 22 (7):2596–2607. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13264
ID: 139376
Type: article
Authors: Fisher, Joshua B.; Sweeney, Sean; Brzostek, Edward R.; Evans, Tom P.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Myers, Jonathan A.; Bourg, Norman A.; Wolf, Amy T.; Howe, Robert W.; Phillips, Richard P.
Keywords: NZP
Abstract: A central challenge in global ecology is the identification of key functional processes in ecosystems that scale, but do not require, data for individual species across landscapes. Given that nearly all tree species form symbiotic relationships with one of two types of mycorrhizal fungi – arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi – and that AM- and ECM-dominated forests often have distinct nutrient economies, the detection and mapping of mycorrhizae over large areas could provide valuable insights about fundamental ecosystem processes such as nutrient cycling, species interactions, and overall forest productivity. We explored remotely sensed tree canopy spectral properties to detect underlying mycorrhizal association across a gradient of AM- and ECM-dominated forest plots. Statistical mining of reflectance and reflectance derivatives across moderate/high-resolution Landsat data revealed distinctly unique phenological signals that differentiated AM and ECM associations. This approach was trained and validated against measurements of tree species and mycorrhizal association across ~130 000 trees throughout the temperate United States. We were able to predict 77% of the variation in mycorrhizal association distribution within the forest plots (P < 0.001). The implications for this work move us toward mapping mycorrhizal association globally and advancing our understanding of biogeochemical cycling and other ecosystem processes.
Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plotGonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaEng, Cheng-YinTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Davies, Stuart J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2016DOI: info:10.1002/ecs2.1595Ecospherev. 7No. 122150-8925
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Eng, Cheng-Yin, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Davies, Stuart J., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2016. "Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot." Ecosphere 7 (12):https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1595
ID: 141218
Type: article
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Eng, Cheng-Yin; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Davies, Stuart J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI; NMNH
Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot - 2014 and 2015Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaEng, Cheng-YinTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, WilliamDavies, Stuart J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2016Dryad Digital Repository
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Eng, Cheng-Yin, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William, Davies, Stuart J., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2016. [Dataset] "Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot - 2014 and 2015." Distributed by Dryad Digital Repository.
ID: 153079
Type: dataset
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Eng, Cheng-Yin; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William; Davies, Stuart J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: Dataset; NZP; STRI