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Showing 1-15 of about 15 results.
Long-Term Impacts of Invasive Insects and Pathogens on Composition, Biomass, and Diversity of Forests in Virginia's Blue Ridge MountainsAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Herrmann, ValentineCass, Wendy B.Williams, Alan B.Paull, Stephen J.Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B.Helcoski, RyanTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.Cosma, Christopher T.Ferson, Abigail E.Kittle, CarolineMeakem, VictoriaMcGregor, Ian R.Prestipino, Maya N.Scott, Michael K.Terrell, Alyssa R.Alonso, AlfonsoDallmeier, FranciscoMcShea, William J.2020DOI: info:10.1007/s10021-020-00503-wEcosystems1432-9840
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Herrmann, Valentine, Cass, Wendy B., Williams, Alan B., Paull, Stephen J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B., Helcoski, Ryan, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., Cosma, Christopher T., Ferson, Abigail E., Kittle, Caroline, Meakem, Victoria, McGregor, Ian R., Prestipino, Maya N., Scott, Michael K., Terrell, Alyssa R., Alonso, Alfonso, Dallmeier, Francisco, and McShea, William J. 2020. "Long-Term Impacts of Invasive Insects and Pathogens on Composition, Biomass, and Diversity of Forests in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains." Ecosystems https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-020-00503-w
ID: 155476
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Herrmann, Valentine; Cass, Wendy B.; Williams, Alan B.; Paull, Stephen J.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B.; Helcoski, Ryan; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Cosma, Christopher T.; Ferson, Abigail E.; Kittle, Caroline; Meakem, Victoria; McGregor, Ian R.; Prestipino, Maya N.; Scott, Michael K.; Terrell, Alyssa R.; Alonso, Alfonso; Dallmeier, Francisco; McShea, William J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Abstract: Exotic forest insects and pathogens (EFIP) have become regular features of temperate forest ecosystems, yet we lack a long-term perspective on their net impacts on tree mortality, carbon sequestration, and tree species diversity. Here, we analyze 3 decades (1987-2019) of forest monitoring data from the Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregion in eastern North America, including 67 plots totaling 29.4 ha, along with a historical survey from 1939. Over the past century, EFIP substantially affected at least eight tree genera. Tree host taxa had anomalously high mortality rates (>= 6% year(-1) from 2008 to 2019 vs 1.4% year(-1) for less-impacted taxa). Following the arrival of EFIP, affected taxa declined in abundance (- 25 to - 100%) and live aboveground biomass (AGB; - 13 to - 100%) within our monitoring plots. We estimate that EFIP were responsible for 21-29% of ecosystem AGB loss through mortality (- 87 g m(-2) year(-1)) from 1991 to 2013 across 66 sites. Over a century, net AGB loss among affected species totaled roughly 6.6-10 kg m(-2). The affected host taxa accounted for 23-29% of genera losses at the plot scale, with mixed net effects on alpha-diversity. Several taxa were lost from our monitoring plots but not completely extirpated from the region. Despite these losses, both total AGB and alpha-diversity were largely recovered through increases in sympatric genera. These results indicate that EFIP have been an important force shaping forest composition, carbon cycling, and diversity. At the same time, less-affected taxa in these relatively diverse temperate forests have conferred substantial resilience with regard to biomass and alpha-diversity.
Spatial covariance of herbivorous and predatory guilds of forest canopy arthropods along a latitudinal gradientMottl, OndrejFibich, PavelKlimes, PetrVolf, MartinTropek, RobertAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Auga, JohnBlair, ThomasButterill, PhilCarscallen, GraceGonzalez-Akre, ErikaGoodman, AaronKaman, OndrejLamarre, Greg P. A.Libra, MartinLosada, Maria E.Manumbor, MarkusMiller, Scott E.Molem, KennethNichols, GeoffreyPlowman, Nichola S.Redmond, ConorSeifert, Carlo L.Vrana, JanWeiblen, George D.Novotny, Vojtech2020DOI: info:10.1111/ele.13579Ecology Lettersv. 23No. 10149915101499–15101461-023X
Mottl, Ondrej, Fibich, Pavel, Klimes, Petr, Volf, Martin, Tropek, Robert, Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Auga, John, Blair, Thomas, Butterill, Phil, Carscallen, Grace, Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Goodman, Aaron, Kaman, Ondrej, Lamarre, Greg P. A., Libra, Martin, Losada, Maria E., Manumbor, Markus, Miller, Scott E., Molem, Kenneth, Nichols, Geoffrey, Plowman, Nichola S., Redmond, Conor, Seifert, Carlo L., Vrana, Jan, Weiblen, George D. et al. 2020. "Spatial covariance of herbivorous and predatory guilds of forest canopy arthropods along a latitudinal gradient." Ecology Letters 23 (10):1499–1510. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13579
ID: 156677
Type: article
Authors: Mottl, Ondrej; Fibich, Pavel; Klimes, Petr; Volf, Martin; Tropek, Robert; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Auga, John; Blair, Thomas; Butterill, Phil; Carscallen, Grace; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Goodman, Aaron; Kaman, Ondrej; Lamarre, Greg P. A.; Libra, Martin; Losada, Maria E.; Manumbor, Markus; Miller, Scott E.; Molem, Kenneth; Nichols, Geoffrey; Plowman, Nichola S.; Redmond, Conor; Seifert, Carlo L.; Vrana, Jan; Weiblen, George D.; Novotny, Vojtech
Keywords: STRI; NMNH; NH-Entomology; NZP
Abstract: Abstract In arthropod community ecology, species richness studies tend to be prioritised over those investigating patterns of abundance. Consequently, the biotic and abiotic drivers of arboreal arthropod abundance are still relatively poorly known. In this cross-continental study, we employ a theoretical framework in order to examine patterns of covariance among herbivorous and predatory arthropod guilds. Leaf-chewing and leaf-mining herbivores, and predatory ants and spiders, were censused on > 1000 trees in nine 0.1 ha forest plots. After controlling for tree size and season, we found no negative pairwise correlations between guild abundances per plot, suggestive of weak signals of both inter-guild competition and top-down regulation of herbivores by predators. Inter-guild interaction strengths did not vary with mean annual temperature, thus opposing the hypothesis that biotic interactions intensify towards the equator. We find evidence for the bottom-up limitation of arthropod abundances via resources and abiotic factors, rather than for competition and predation.
No significant increase in tree mortality following coring in a temperate hardwood forestHelcoski, RyanTepley, Alan J.McGarvey, Jennifer C.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaThompson, Jonathan R.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2019DOI: info:10.3959/1536-1098-75.1.67Tree-Ring Researchv. 75No. 1677267–721536-1098
Helcoski, Ryan, Tepley, Alan J., McGarvey, Jennifer C., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Thompson, Jonathan R., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2019. "No significant increase in tree mortality following coring in a temperate hardwood forest." Tree-Ring Research 75 (1):67–72. https://doi.org/10.3959/1536-1098-75.1.67
ID: 150142
Type: article
Authors: Helcoski, Ryan; Tepley, Alan J.; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Thompson, Jonathan R.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: STRI; NZP
Abstract: The collection of tree-ring data from living trees is widespread and highly valuable in ecological and dendro-climatological research, yet there is concern that coring injures trees, potentially contributing to mortality. Unlike resinous conifers that can quickly compartmentalize wounds, less decay-resistant angiosperms may face more pronounced risk of injury from coring. To test if coring increases mortality rates in temperate hardwood trees, we leverage a unique dataset tracking the mortality of cored and uncored hardwood trees representing 19 species from 10 genera in a 26-ha plot in Virginia, USA. We compare mortality rates between 935 cored trees and 8,605 uncored trees for seven years following coring. Annual mortality rates did not differ between cored trees (1.71% yr−1; 95% CI 1.40 to 2.20)and uncored trees (1.85% yr−1; 95% CI 1.70 to 2.28)across the full dataset , nor were there differences by genus or size class. These results indicate that the risk of hardwood mortality due to increment coring is probably lower than previously assumed. However, these results cannot rule out the possibility that coring elevates hardwood mortality in other climates or when trees face multiple additional stressors that were not prevalent over the course of our study.
Quantitative assessment of plant-arthropod interactions in forest canopies: A plot-based approachVolf, MartinKlimeš, PetrLamarre, Greg P. A.Redmond, Conor M.Seifert, Carlo L.Abe, TomokazuAuga, JohnAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Basset, YvesBeckett, SaulButterill, Philip T.Drozd, PavelGonzález-Akre, ErikaKaman, OndřejKamata, NaotoLaird-Hopkins, BenitaLibra, MartinManumbor, MarkusMiller, Scott E.Molem, KennethMottl, OndřejMurakami, MasashiNakaji, TatsuroPlowman, Nichola S.Pyszko, PetrŠigut, MartinŠipoš, JanTropek, RobertWeiblen, George D.Novotny, Vojtech2019DOI: info:10.1371/journal.pone.0222119PloS Onev. 14No. 10Article e0222119Article e02221191932-6203
Volf, Martin, Klimeš, Petr, Lamarre, Greg P. A., Redmond, Conor M., Seifert, Carlo L., Abe, Tomokazu, Auga, John, Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Basset, Yves, Beckett, Saul, Butterill, Philip T., Drozd, Pavel, González-Akre, Erika, Kaman, Ondřej, Kamata, Naoto, Laird-Hopkins, Benita, Libra, Martin, Manumbor, Markus, Miller, Scott E., Molem, Kenneth, Mottl, Ondřej, Murakami, Masashi, Nakaji, Tatsuro, Plowman, Nichola S., Pyszko, Petr et al. 2019. "Quantitative assessment of plant-arthropod interactions in forest canopies: A plot-based approach." PloS One 14 (10):Article e0222119. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0222119
ID: 153001
Type: article
Authors: Volf, Martin; Klimeš, Petr; Lamarre, Greg P. A.; Redmond, Conor M.; Seifert, Carlo L.; Abe, Tomokazu; Auga, John; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Basset, Yves; Beckett, Saul; Butterill, Philip T.; Drozd, Pavel; González-Akre, Erika; Kaman, Ondřej; Kamata, Naoto; Laird-Hopkins, Benita; Libra, Martin; Manumbor, Markus; Miller, Scott E.; Molem, Kenneth; Mottl, Ondřej; Murakami, Masashi; Nakaji, Tatsuro; Plowman, Nichola S.; Pyszko, Petr; Šigut, Martin; Šipoš, Jan; Tropek, Robert; Weiblen, George D.; Novotny, Vojtech
Keywords: NMNH; STRI; NH-Entomology; NZP
Abstract: Research on canopy arthropods has progressed from species inventories to the study of their interactions and networks, enhancing our understanding of how hyper-diverse communities are maintained. Previous studies often focused on sampling individual tree species, individual trees or their parts. We argue that such selective sampling is not ideal when analyzing interaction network structure, and may lead to erroneous conclusions. We developed practical and reproducible sampling guidelines for the plot-based analysis of arthropod interaction networks in forest canopies. Our sampling protocol focused on insect herbivores (leaf-chewing insect larvae, miners and gallers) and non-flying invertebrate predators (spiders and ants). We quantitatively sampled the focal arthropods from felled trees, or from trees accessed by canopy cranes or cherry pickers in 53 0.1 ha forest plots in five biogeographic regions, comprising 6,280 trees in total. All three methods required a similar sampling effort and provided good foliage accessibility. Furthermore, we compared interaction networks derived from plot-based data to interaction networks derived from simulated non-plot-based data focusing either on common tree species or a representative selection of tree families. All types of non-plot-based data showed highly biased network structure towards higher connectance, higher web asymmetry, and higher nestedness temperature when compared with plot-based data. Furthermore, some types of non-plot-based data showed biased diversity of the associated herbivore species and specificity of their interactions. Plot-based sampling thus appears to be the most rigorous approach for reconstructing realistic, quantitative plant-arthropod interaction networks that are comparable across sites and regions. Studies of plant interactions have greatly benefited from a plot-based approach and we argue that studies of arthropod interactions would benefit in the same way. We conclude that plot-based studies on canopy arthropods would yield important insights into the processes of interaction network assembly and dynamics, which could be maximised via a coordinated network of plot-based study sites.
Population Structure and Natural History of Creaser's Mud Turtle (Kinosternon creaseri) in Central YucatanMacip-Rios, RodrigoJones, Michael T.Willey, Lisabeth L.Akre, Thomas S.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaDiaz-Gamboa, Luis E.2018Herpetological Conservation and Biologyv. 13No. 2366372366–3722151-0733
Macip-Rios, Rodrigo, Jones, Michael T., Willey, Lisabeth L., Akre, Thomas S., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, and Diaz-Gamboa, Luis E. 2018. "Population Structure and Natural History of Creaser's Mud Turtle (Kinosternon creaseri) in Central Yucatan." Herpetological Conservation and Biology 13 (2):366–372.
ID: 148488
Type: article
Authors: Macip-Rios, Rodrigo; Jones, Michael T.; Willey, Lisabeth L.; Akre, Thomas S.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Diaz-Gamboa, Luis E.
Keywords: NZP
Abstract: Creaser's Mud Turtle (Kinosternon creaseri Hartweg, 1934) is a kinosternid turtle that is widely distributed across the three states of the Yucatan Peninsula in southeastern Mexico. Although its distribution and habitat associations have been established for nearly three decades (Iverson 1988), primarily anecdotal data are available on local population structure and natural history. We conducted a capture-recapture study of K. creaseri in small, limestone depressions (haltunes) distributed over about 650 ha of forested hills in the Puuc Hills Region of south-central Yucatan. We used baited funnel traps in seven haltunes with surface areas ranging from 2.3 to 54.9 m(2) for a combined total of 445 trap hours, and manually searched 20 additional small haltunes (<= 1.5 m semi-major axis). We captured, marked, and released 174 individual turtles. Our sample included 21 adults (12 males and nine females) and 139 juveniles or hatchlings with carapace lengths < 90 mm. Turtle densities ranged from 1.55-5.11 turtles/m(2) of surface water. Preliminary results from our two-year sampling period provide no evidence of individual turtle movement between ponds. Further, we report on novel ecological interactions of K. creaseri, such as attempted depredation of hatchlings by giant water bugs (Lethocerus sp.), feeding behavior of trapped turtles on adult Rio Grande Leopard Frogs (Lithobates berlandieri), and shared rock-crevice aestivation with the Furrowed Wood Turtle, Rhinoclemmys areolata. We also compiled new occurrence data for the species and report an expanded known distribution of this poorly known species.
Role of tree size in moist tropical forest carbon cycling and water deficit responsesMeakem, VictoriaTepley, Alan J.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaHerrmann, ValentineMuller-Landau, Helene C.Wright, S. JosephHubbell, Stephen P.Condit, Richard S.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2018DOI: info:10.1111/nph.14633New Phytologistv. 219No. 3947958947–9580028-646X
Meakem, Victoria, Tepley, Alan J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Herrmann, Valentine, Muller-Landau, Helene C., Wright, S. Joseph, Hubbell, Stephen P., Condit, Richard S., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2018. "Role of tree size in moist tropical forest carbon cycling and water deficit responses." New Phytologist 219 (3):947–958. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14633
Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plotGonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaEng, Cheng-YinTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Davies, Stuart J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2017DOI: info:10.5479/data_scbi/10088/31954Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Eng, Cheng-Yin, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Davies, Stuart J., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2017. [Dataset] "Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot." Distributed by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. https://doi.org/10.5479/data_scbi/10088/31954
ID: 143607
Type: dataset
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Eng, Cheng-Yin; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Davies, Stuart J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: STRI; Dataset; NZP
Sapling growth rates reveal conspecific negative density dependence in a temperate forestRamage, Benjamin S.Johnson, Daniel J.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaMcShea, William J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Bourg, Norman A.Clay, Keith2017DOI: info:10.1002/ece3.3298Ecology and Evolutionv. 7No. 19766176717661–76712045-7758
Ramage, Benjamin S., Johnson, Daniel J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, McShea, William J., Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Bourg, Norman A., and Clay, Keith. 2017. "Sapling growth rates reveal conspecific negative density dependence in a temperate forest." Ecology and Evolution 7 (19):7661–7671. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3298
ID: 143756
Type: article
Authors: Ramage, Benjamin S.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; McShea, William J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Clay, Keith
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plotGonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaEng, Cheng-YinTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Davies, Stuart J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2016DOI: info:10.1002/ecs2.1595Ecospherev. 7No. 122150-8925
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Eng, Cheng-Yin, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Davies, Stuart J., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2016. "Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot." Ecosphere 7 (12):https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1595
ID: 141218
Type: article
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Eng, Cheng-Yin; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Davies, Stuart J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI; NMNH
Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot - 2014 and 2015Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaMeakem, VictoriaEng, Cheng-YinTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, WilliamDavies, Stuart J.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2016Dryad Digital Repository
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Meakem, Victoria, Eng, Cheng-Yin, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William, Davies, Stuart J., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2016. [Dataset] "Patterns of tree mortality in a temperate deciduous forest derived from a large forest dynamics plot - 2014 and 2015." Distributed by Dryad Digital Repository.
ID: 153079
Type: dataset
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Meakem, Victoria; Eng, Cheng-Yin; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William; Davies, Stuart J.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: Dataset; NZP; STRI
Fine-scale patch mosaic of developmental stages in Northeast American secondary temperate forests: the European perspectiveKrál, KamilShue, JessicaVrška, TomášGonzalez-Akre, ErikaParker, Geoffrey G.McShea, William J.McMahon, Sean M.2016DOI: info:10.1007/s10342-016-0988-1European Journal of Forest Researchv. 135No. 5981996981–9961612-4669
Král, Kamil, Shue, Jessica, Vrška, Tomáš, Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Parker, Geoffrey G., McShea, William J., and McMahon, Sean M. 2016. "Fine-scale patch mosaic of developmental stages in Northeast American secondary temperate forests: the European perspective." European Journal of Forest Research 135 (5):981–996. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10342-016-0988-1
ID: 140290
Type: article
Authors: Král, Kamil; Shue, Jessica; Vrška, Tomáš; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Parker, Geoffrey G.; McShea, William J.; McMahon, Sean M.
Keywords: NZP; SERC
CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global changeAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Davies, Stuart JamesBennett, Amy C.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaMuller-Landau, Helene C.Wright, S. JosephAbu Salim, KamariahAlmeyda Zambrano, Angélica M.Alonso, AlfonsoBaltzer, Jennifer L.Basset, YvesBourg, Norman A.Broadbent, Eben N.Brockelman, Warren Y.Bunyavejchewin, SarayudhBurslem, David F. R. P.Butt, NathalieCao, MinCardenas, DaironChuyong, George B.Clay, KeithCordell, SusanDattaraja, Handanakere S.Deng, XiaobaoDetto, MatteoDu, XiaojunDuque, AlvaroErikson, David L.Ewango, Corneille E. N.Fischer, Gunter A.Fletcher, ChristineFoster, Robin B.Giardina, Christian P.Gilbert, Gregory S.Gunatilleke, NimalGunatilleke, SavitriHao, ZhanqingHargrove, William W.Hart, Terese B.Hau, Billy C. H.He, FangliangHoffman, Forrest M.Howe, Robert W.Hubbell, Stephen P.Inman-Narahari, FaithJansen, Patrick A.Jiang, MingxiJohnson, Daniel J.Kanzaki, MamoruKassim, Abdul RahmanKenfack, DavidKibet, StalineKinnaird, Margaret F.Korte, LisaKral, KamilKumar, JitendraLarson, Andrew J.Li, YideLi, XiankunLiu, ShirongLum, Shawn K. Y.Lutz, James A.Ma, KepingMaddalena, Damian M.Makana, Jean-RemyMalhi, YadvinderMarthews, TobyMat Serudin, RafizahMcMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.Memiaghe, Hervé R.Mi, XiangchengMizuno, TakashiMorecroft, MichaelMyers, Jonathan A.Novotny, Vojtechde Oliveira, Alexandre A.Ong, Perry S.Orwig, David A.Ostertag, Rebeccaden Ouden, JanParker, Geoffrey G.Phillips, Richard P.Sack, LawrenSainge, Moses N.Sang, WeiguoSri-ngernyuang, KriangsakSukumar, RamanSun, I-FSungpalee, WitchaphartSuresh, Hebbalalu SathyanarayanaTan, SylvesterThomas, Sean C.Thomas, Duncan W.Thompson, JillTurner, Benjamin L.Uriarte, MariaValencia, RenatoVallejo, Marta I.Vicentini, AlbertoVrška, TomášWang, XihuaWang, XugaoWeiblen, GeorgeWolf, AmyXu, HanYap, SandraZimmerman, Jess2015DOI: info:10.1111/gcb.12712Global Change Biologyv. 21No. 2528549528–5491354-1013
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Davies, Stuart James, Bennett, Amy C., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Muller-Landau, Helene C., Wright, S. Joseph, Abu Salim, Kamariah, Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M., Alonso, Alfonso, Baltzer, Jennifer L., Basset, Yves, Bourg, Norman A., Broadbent, Eben N., Brockelman, Warren Y., Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh, Burslem, David F. R. P., Butt, Nathalie, Cao, Min, Cardenas, Dairon, Chuyong, George B., Clay, Keith, Cordell, Susan, Dattaraja, Handanakere S., Deng, Xiaobao, Detto, Matteo et al. 2015. "CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change." Global Change Biology 21 (2):528–549. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12712
ID: 128088
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Davies, Stuart James; Bennett, Amy C.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Wright, S. Joseph; Abu Salim, Kamariah; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M.; Alonso, Alfonso; Baltzer, Jennifer L.; Basset, Yves; Bourg, Norman A.; Broadbent, Eben N.; Brockelman, Warren Y.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Burslem, David F. R. P.; Butt, Nathalie; Cao, Min; Cardenas, Dairon; Chuyong, George B.; Clay, Keith; Cordell, Susan; Dattaraja, Handanakere S.; Deng, Xiaobao; Detto, Matteo; Du, Xiaojun; Duque, Alvaro; Erikson, David L.; Ewango, Corneille E. N.; Fischer, Gunter A.; Fletcher, Christine; Foster, Robin B.; Giardina, Christian P.; Gilbert, Gregory S.; Gunatilleke, Nimal; Gunatilleke, Savitri; Hao, Zhanqing; Hargrove, William W.; Hart, Terese B.; Hau, Billy C. H.; He, Fangliang; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Howe, Robert W.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Inman-Narahari, Faith; Jansen, Patrick A.; Jiang, Mingxi; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kanzaki, Mamoru; Kassim, Abdul Rahman; Kenfack, David; Kibet, Staline; Kinnaird, Margaret F.; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Kumar, Jitendra; Larson, Andrew J.; Li, Yide; Li, Xiankun; Liu, Shirong; Lum, Shawn K. Y.; Lutz, James A.; Ma, Keping; Maddalena, Damian M.; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marthews, Toby; Mat Serudin, Rafizah; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.; Memiaghe, Hervé R.; Mi, Xiangcheng; Mizuno, Takashi; Morecroft, Michael; Myers, Jonathan A.; Novotny, Vojtech; de Oliveira, Alexandre A.; Ong, Perry S.; Orwig, David A.; Ostertag, Rebecca; den Ouden, Jan; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Phillips, Richard P.; Sack, Lawren; Sainge, Moses N.; Sang, Weiguo; Sri-ngernyuang, Kriangsak; Sukumar, Raman; Sun, I-F; Sungpalee, Witchaphart; Suresh, Hebbalalu Sathyanarayana; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Sean C.; Thomas, Duncan W.; Thompson, Jill; Turner, Benjamin L.; Uriarte, Maria; Valencia, Renato; Vallejo, Marta I.; Vicentini, Alberto; Vrška, Tomáš; Wang, Xihua; Wang, Xugao; Weiblen, George; Wolf, Amy; Xu, Han; Yap, Sandra; Zimmerman, Jess
Keywords: NZP; SERC; STRI
Abstract: Global change is impacting forests worldwide, threatening biodiversity and ecosystem services including climate regulation. Understanding how forests respond is critical to forest conservation and climate protection. This review describes an international network of 59 long-term forest dynamics research sites (CTFS-ForestGEO) useful for characterizing forest responses to global change. Within very large plots (median size 25 ha), all stems ≥1 cm diameter are identified to species, mapped, and regularly recensused according to standardized protocols. CTFS-ForestGEO spans 25°S–61°N latitude, is generally representative of the range of bioclimatic, edaphic, and topographic conditions experienced by forests worldwide, and is the only forest monitoring network that applies a standardized protocol to each of the world's major forest biomes. Supplementary standardized measurements at subsets of the sites provide additional information on plants, animals, and ecosystem and environmental variables. CTFS-ForestGEO sites are experiencing multifaceted anthropogenic global change pressures including warming (average 0.61 °C), changes in precipitation (up to ±30% change), atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds (up to 3.8 g N m−2 yr−1 and 3.1 g S m−2 yr−1), and forest fragmentation in the surrounding landscape (up to 88% reduced tree cover within 5 km). The broad suite of measurements made at CTFS-ForestGEO sites makes it possible to investigate the complex ways in which global change is impacting forest dynamics. Ongoing research across the CTFS-ForestGEO network is yielding insights into how and why the forests are changing, and continued monitoring will provide vital contributions to understanding worldwide forest diversity and dynamics in an era of global change.
Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forestAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.McGarvey, Jennifer C.Muller-Landau, Helene C.Park, Janice Y.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaHerrmann, ValentineBennett, Amy C.So, Christopher V.Bourg, Norman A.Thompson, Jonathan R.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.2015Dryad Digital Repository
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., McGarvey, Jennifer C., Muller-Landau, Helene C., Park, Janice Y., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Herrmann, Valentine, Bennett, Amy C., So, Christopher V., Bourg, Norman A., Thompson, Jonathan R., McMahon, Sean M., and McShea, William J. 2015. [Dataset] "Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forest." Distributed by Dryad Digital Repository.
ID: 153078
Type: dataset
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Park, Janice Y.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Herrmann, Valentine; Bennett, Amy C.; So, Christopher V.; Bourg, Norman A.; Thompson, Jonathan R.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.
Keywords: Dataset; NZP; SERC; STRI
Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forestAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.McGarvey, Jennifer C.Muller-Landau, Helene C.Park, Janice Y.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaHerrmann, ValentineBennett, Amy C.So, Christopher V.Bourg, Norman A.Thompson, Jonathan R.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.2015DOI: info:10.1111/1365-2435.12470Functional Ecologyv. 29No. 12158716021587–16020269-8463
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., McGarvey, Jennifer C., Muller-Landau, Helene C., Park, Janice Y., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Herrmann, Valentine, Bennett, Amy C., So, Christopher V., Bourg, Norman A., Thompson, Jonathan R., McMahon, Sean M., and McShea, William J. 2015. "Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forest." Functional Ecology 29 (12):1587–1602. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12470
ID: 136051
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Park, Janice Y.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Herrmann, Valentine; Bennett, Amy C.; So, Christopher V.; Bourg, Norman A.; Thompson, Jonathan R.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.
Keywords: NZP; SERC; STRI
Paleobotanica: Plantas del pasado geologicoGonzalez-Akre, ErikaMarcelo Sanchez-Villagra2012157173ZurichUniversitat Zurich157–1739783033036062
Gonzalez-Akre, Erika. 2012. "Paleobotanica: Plantas del pasado geologico." in Venezuela Paleontologica. Evolucion de la biodiversidad en el pasado geologico, edited by Marcelo Sanchez-Villagra., 157–173. Zurich: Universitat Zurich.
ID: 148139
Type: chapter
Authors: Gonzalez-Akre, Erika
Keywords: Pre_SI