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Showing 1-19 of about 19 results.
Fossil sea catfish (Siluriformes; Ariidae) otoliths and in-skull otoliths from the Neogene of the Western Central AtlanticAguilera, OrangelLopes, Ricardo T.Rodriguez, Felixdos Santos, Thaís M.Rodrigues-Almeida, CarolineAlmeida, PauloMachado, Alessandra S.Moretti, Tailan2020DOI: info:10.1016/j.jsames.2020.102619Journal of South American Earth Sciencesv. 1011026191026190895-9811
Aguilera, Orangel, Lopes, Ricardo T., Rodriguez, Felix, dos Santos, Thaís M., Rodrigues-Almeida, Caroline, Almeida, Paulo, Machado, Alessandra S., and Moretti, Tailan. 2020. "Fossil sea catfish (Siluriformes; Ariidae) otoliths and in-skull otoliths from the Neogene of the Western Central Atlantic." Journal of South American Earth Sciences 101:102619. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2020.102619
ID: 155492
Type: article
Authors: Aguilera, Orangel; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Rodriguez, Felix; dos Santos, Thaís M.; Rodrigues-Almeida, Caroline; Almeida, Paulo; Machado, Alessandra S.; Moretti, Tailan
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The examined Ariidae marine catfish from the Neogene of tropical America consisted of isolated skulls, otoliths and bone fragments, some of which were described independently as otolith-based species or skull-based species. We used three-dimensional digital rendering (microCT) of skull and otolith reconstructions to recognize anatomical patterns including skull-otolith morphology, spatial allocations of otoliths in the endocranium for taxonomic identifications. We recognized isolated Proto-Caribbean otoliths of Cathorops sp. from the late early Miocene to early Pliocene formations and isolated otoliths of †Aspistor verumquadriscutis, †Bagre urumacoensis and Notarius sp. from the late Miocene. We explored the endocrania of four fossil Ariidae skulls from the late Oligocene to late early Miocene Proto-Caribbean to determine their internal otolith-cranial morphology, and we identified and described the skulls of †Bagre protocaribbeanus and †Cantarius nolfi and erected the new species of †Bagre castilloensi n. sp. and †Bagre ornatus n. sp. based on the internal otolith-skull association. The first fossil record of Bagre marinus from the early Pliocene Cubagua Formation to the late Pliocene San Gregorio Formation completed the ariid geochronological sequence. We discuss the differential stages of fossil preservation of bioapatite skulls and aragonite otoliths according to the diagenetic processes as well as the paleoenvironmental conditions in the sedimentary basins. Detailed microCT, 3D reconstructions, X-rays, dry prepared skeletons and digital photos of otolith and skull are shown to elucidate the in-skull otoliths species descriptions.
First Neogene Proto-Caribbean pufferfish: new evidence for Tetraodontidae radiationAguilera, OrangelRodriguez, FelixMoretti, TailanBello, MariannaLopes, Ricardo T.Machado, Alessandra S.dos Santos, Thaís M.Béarez, Philippe2018DOI: info:10.1016/j.jsames.2018.04.017Journal of South American Earth Sciencesv. 85576757–670895-9811
Aguilera, Orangel, Rodriguez, Felix, Moretti, Tailan, Bello, Marianna, Lopes, Ricardo T., Machado, Alessandra S., dos Santos, Thaís M., and Béarez, Philippe. 2018. "First Neogene Proto-Caribbean pufferfish: new evidence for Tetraodontidae radiation." Journal of South American Earth Sciences 85:57–67. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2018.04.017
ID: 146297
Type: article
Authors: Aguilera, Orangel; Rodriguez, Felix; Moretti, Tailan; Bello, Marianna; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Machado, Alessandra S.; dos Santos, Thaís M.; Béarez, Philippe
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: This study reports a three-dimensional fossil skull of a Tetraodontidae that dates to the middle Miocene (Serravallian), which was recovered from a rock matrix from the Valiente Peninsula Formation in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago, Caribbean coast of Panama. The new species, +Lagocephalus striatus n. sp., is the first fossil species of Tetraodontidae described from the Proto-Caribbean/Central Western Atlantic. We used high-resolution micro-CT scans of fossil and extant species to identify morphological characters on the skull, including the neurocranium, oromandibular and opercular bones, hyoid arch, and pectoral girdle. Specimens of both extant and extinct species of similar size were compared for accurate identification. We assess the paleogeographic distribution of the pufferfish group in the Neogene of Tropical America after the complete formation of the Isthmus of Panama.
Neogene Proto-Caribbean porcupinefishes (Diodontidae)Aguilera, OrangelSilva, Guilherme Oliveira AndradeLopes, Ricardo TadeuMachado, Alessandra Silveirados Santos, Thaís MariaMarques, GabrielaBertucci, ThayseAguiar, ThayanneCarrillo-Briceño, JorgeRodriguez, FelixJaramillo, Carlos2017DOI: info:10.1371/journal.pone.0181670PLOS ONEv. 12No. 71932-6203
Aguilera, Orangel, Silva, Guilherme Oliveira Andrade, Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu, Machado, Alessandra Silveira, dos Santos, Thaís Maria, Marques, Gabriela, Bertucci, Thayse, Aguiar, Thayanne, Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge, Rodriguez, Felix, and Jaramillo, Carlos. 2017. "Neogene Proto-Caribbean porcupinefishes (Diodontidae)." PLOS ONE 12 (7):https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0181670
ID: 143454
Type: article
Authors: Aguilera, Orangel; Silva, Guilherme Oliveira Andrade; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Machado, Alessandra Silveira; dos Santos, Thaís Maria; Marques, Gabriela; Bertucci, Thayse; Aguiar, Thayanne; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge; Rodriguez, Felix; Jaramillo, Carlos
Keywords: STRI; fellow
A Modern Fish Tooth Reference Collection to Help Track Historical Change in Caribbean Reef Fish Communities from Tooth Fossils Found in Reef SedimentsMcComas, KimberlyCramer, Katie L.O'Dea, AaronRodriguez, FelixNorris, Richard D.2016
McComas, Kimberly, Cramer, Katie L., O'Dea, Aaron, Rodriguez, Felix, and Norris, Richard D. 2016. [Poster] A Modern Fish Tooth Reference Collection to Help Track Historical Change in Caribbean Reef Fish Communities from Tooth Fossils Found in Reef Sediments. Given at ICRS,
ID: 153810
Type: poster
Authors: McComas, Kimberly; Cramer, Katie L.; O'Dea, Aaron; Rodriguez, Felix; Norris, Richard D.
Keywords: STRI; poster
Abstract: Centuries of overfishing along with more recent habitat degradation have altered Caribbean reef fish communities and caused a loss of 50-80% of corals since the 1980s. The lack of an ecological baseline for Caribbean reef ecosystems, including data on reef fish abundance and composition, prevents an understanding of the full extent and causes of the recent Caribbean reef collapse. Fossil records of fish teeth are abundant in reef sediments and can provide a quantitative reconstruction of changes in reef fish communities over periods of both low and high human impact. To track changes in reef fish assemblages and demonstrate the variety of tooth morphotypes found within the ichthyolith record, we have constructed the first fish tooth reference collection for modern Caribbean reef fishes. From 375 specimens amassed from museum collections in the US and fish markets and field collections in Panama, totaling 81 unique families and 256 unique species, we developed a photographic reference collection via dissection and photography of oral and pharyngeal jaws and teeth. The collection, available at http:// ichthyolith.ucsd.edu/, highlights the noticeably small tooth sizes of almost all species regardless of body size and diet. This collection has been utilized to classify abundant fossil teeth from reef matrix cores from Caribbean Panama to family level, enabling us to track changes in ecologically important groups such as parrotfish from the prehistorical period to the present.
The first fossil record of the 'White Sharks' (Carcharodon carcharias) from Central America and its association with other macropredatory sharksCarrillo-Briceno, Jorge B.De Gracia, CarlosRodriguez, Felix2015
Carrillo-Briceno, Jorge B., De Gracia, Carlos, and Rodriguez, Felix. 2015. [Poster] The first fossil record of the "White Sharks" (Carcharodon carcharias) from Central America and its association with other macropredatory sharks. Given at XIII Annual meeting Opole, Poland EAVP,
ID: 153811
Type: poster
Authors: Carrillo-Briceno, Jorge B.; De Gracia, Carlos; Rodriguez, Felix
Keywords: STRI; poster
Abstract: The Carcharodon carcharias is the largest living predatory fish, with a total length exceeding 6 meters. This shark appears during the early Pliocene, and currently has a cosmopolitan distribution, inhabiting mainly in coastal and offshore temperate environments, although some individuals have been referred to tropical waters. From North and South America its Pliocene fossils have been recorded from Mexico and USA, and the Pacific coast of Peru and Chile. For the Caribbean region, dubious records of Carcharodon carcharias have been referred to the early-middle Miocene of Cuba and late Miocene of Panama, suggesting for both an erroneous taxonomic identification. Here based on an upper anterior tooth of Carcharodon carcharias, we report the first fossil record for this taxon from Central America (Punta Burica, Panama gulf of Chiriquí). The specimen was collected in a conglomerate (shallow water facies) of the upper section of the Burica Formation (late Pliocene-Pleistocene) together with isolated teeth of Carcharhinus plumbeus, Carcharhinus spp., and Galeocerdo cuvier. Another locality (Calabazo creek) from the same Burica Formation included a few specimens of Carcharhinus limbatus, Negaprion brevirostris, and Rhizoprionodon cf. longurio. Using "tooth enamel height" and allometric models previously performed to estimate the total length in Carcharodon carcharias we inferred for our specimen a body size close to 4 meters long, corresponding with an adult. This co-occurrence of Carcharodon carcharias and other large sharks as Galeocerdo cuvier, suggests that these marine large predators could have frequented the same environment without ecological exclusion.
Molluscan subfossil assemblages reveal the long-term deterioration of coral reef environments in Caribbean PanamaCramer, Katie L.Leonard-Pingel, JillRodríguez, FélixJackson, Jeremy B. C.2015DOI: info:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2015.05.031Marine pollution bulletinv. 96No. 1-2176187176–1870025-326X
Cramer, Katie L., Leonard-Pingel, Jill, Rodríguez, Félix, and Jackson, Jeremy B. C. 2015. "Molluscan subfossil assemblages reveal the long-term deterioration of coral reef environments in Caribbean Panama." Marine pollution bulletin 96 (1-2):176–187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2015.05.031
ID: 136104
Type: article
Authors: Cramer, Katie L.; Leonard-Pingel, Jill; Rodríguez, Félix; Jackson, Jeremy B. C.
Keywords: NH-Paleobiology; NMNH; STRI
Abstract: Caribbean reef corals have declined sharply since the 1980s, but the lack of prior baseline data has hindered identification of drivers of change. To assess anthropogenic change in reef environments over the past century, we tracked the composition of subfossil assemblages of bivalve and gastropod mollusks excavated from pits below lagoonal and offshore reefs in Bocas del Toro, Panama. The higher prevalence of (a) infaunal suspension-feeding bivalves and herbivorous and omnivorous gastropods in lagoons and (b) epifaunal and suspension-feeding bivalves and carnivorous and suspension-feeding gastropods offshore reflected the greater influence of land-based nutrients/sediments within lagoons. Temporal changes indicated deteriorating environmental conditions pre-1960 in lagoons and post-1960 offshore, with offshore communities becoming more similar to lagoonal ones since 1960. Relative abundances of dominant bivalve species tracked those of their coral hosts, revealing broader ecosystem effects of coral community change. The nature and timing of changes implicate land-based runoff in reef deterioration.
Fossil Chondrichthyes from the Central Eastern Pacific Ocean and their Paleoceanographic SignificanceCarrillo-Briceño, Jorge D.Aguilera, Orangel A.Rodriguez, Félix2014DOI: info:10.1016/j.jsames.2014.01.001Journal of South American Earth Sciencesv. 51769076–900895-9811
Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge D., Aguilera, Orangel A., and Rodriguez, Félix. 2014. "Fossil Chondrichthyes from the Central Eastern Pacific Ocean and their Paleoceanographic Significance." Journal of South American Earth Sciences 51:76–90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsames.2014.01.001
ID: 118326
Type: article
Authors: Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge D.; Aguilera, Orangel A.; Rodriguez, Félix
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The study of the chondrichthyan fauna from the Angostura, Onzole, Canoa and Jama formations, in the Neogene of Bordón and Manabí basins, Ecuador, reveals the presence of 30 taxa, including the deep water shark +Chlamydoselachus landinii sp. nov. The assemblages are dominated by tropical shallow and deep water chondrichthyans, suggesting paleoenvironments associated with a short platform shelf bordering a deep margin. These assemblages are the most diverse shark and ray association known from the Tropical Central Eastern Pacific Ocean in the South American coastal basin, and provide new information on the paleoecology and paleodiversity of Neogene chondrichthyans.
Biomonitoreo por la contaminacion de TBT; incidencia de imposex hacia el sector oeste del pacifico panamenoRodriguez, FelixAlvarado, Nelva2014v. 2182118–212310-6875
Rodriguez, Felix and Alvarado, Nelva. 2014. "Biomonitoreo por la contaminacion de TBT; incidencia de imposex hacia el sector oeste del pacifico panameno." ,
ID: 154016
Type: magazine_article
Authors: Rodriguez, Felix; Alvarado, Nelva
Keywords: STRI
Nivel de contaminacion y distribucion espacial de metales pesados en sedimentos superficiales de Bahia Damas, Isla CoibaArauz, DianaGarcia, Ana LuisaRodriguez, FelixZarate, Manuel F.2013Revista I + D tecnologicov. 9No. 2142314–23
Arauz, Diana, Garcia, Ana Luisa, Rodriguez, Felix, and Zarate, Manuel F. 2013. "Nivel de contaminacion y distribucion espacial de metales pesados en sedimentos superficiales de Bahia Damas, Isla Coiba." Revista I + D tecnologico 9 (2):14–23.
ID: 122170
Type: article
Authors: Arauz, Diana; Garcia, Ana Luisa; Rodriguez, Felix; Zarate, Manuel F.
Keywords: STRI; si-federal
Marked Ecological Shifts in Seagrass and Reef Molluscan Communities since the Midholocene in the Southwestern CaribbeanFredston-Hermann, AlexaO'Dea, AaronRodriguez, FelixThompson, William G.Todd, Jonathan A.2013DOI: info:10.5343/bms.2012.1077Bulletin of Marine Sciencev. 89No. 39831002983–10020007-4977
Fredston-Hermann, Alexa, O'Dea, Aaron, Rodriguez, Felix, Thompson, William G., and Todd, Jonathan A. 2013. "Marked Ecological Shifts in Seagrass and Reef Molluscan Communities since the Midholocene in the Southwestern Caribbean." Bulletin of Marine Science 89 (3):983–1002. https://doi.org/10.5343/bms.2012.1077
ID: 116734
Type: article
Authors: Fredston-Hermann, Alexa; O'Dea, Aaron; Rodriguez, Felix; Thompson, William G.; Todd, Jonathan A.
Keywords: STRI; si-federal; fellow
El Gran Intercambio BioticoSautu, AdrianaRodriguez, Felix2013
Sautu, Adriana and Rodriguez, Felix. 2013. "El Gran Intercambio Biotico." ,
ID: 153809
Type: newspaper_article
Authors: Sautu, Adriana; Rodriguez, Felix
Keywords: STRI
Respuesta ambiental en el Pacífico frente a la subducción de la dorsal asísmica de Cocos (Panamá y Costa Rica)De Gracia, CarlosO'Dea, AaronRodriguez, FélixD'Croz, Luis2012Revista De Biología Tropicalv. 60No. 2893908893–9080034-7744
De Gracia, Carlos, O'Dea, Aaron, Rodriguez, Félix, and D'Croz, Luis. 2012. "Respuesta ambiental en el Pacífico frente a la subducción de la dorsal asísmica de Cocos (Panamá y Costa Rica)." Revista De Biología Tropical 60 (2):893–908.
ID: 111964
Type: article
Authors: De Gracia, Carlos; O'Dea, Aaron; Rodriguez, Félix; D'Croz, Luis
Keywords: STRI; fellow
History of upwelling in the Tropical Eastern Pacific and the paleogeography of the Isthmus of PanamaO'Dea, AaronHoyos, NataliaRodríguez, FélixDe Gracia, BrigidaDe Gracia, Carlos2012DOI: info:10.1016/j.palaeo.2012.06.007Palaeogeography palaeoclimatology palaeoecologyv. 348/349596659–660031-0182
O'Dea, Aaron, Hoyos, Natalia, Rodríguez, Félix, De Gracia, Brigida, and De Gracia, Carlos. 2012. "History of upwelling in the Tropical Eastern Pacific and the paleogeography of the Isthmus of Panama." Palaeogeography palaeoclimatology palaeoecology 348/349:59–66. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2012.06.007
ID: 111811
Type: article
Authors: O'Dea, Aaron; Hoyos, Natalia; Rodríguez, Félix; De Gracia, Brigida; De Gracia, Carlos
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Today there is a tight-knit relationship between the elevation of the Central American Isthmus and the oceanographic conditions of the Tropical Eastern Pacific. Where the elevation drops low-level wind jets pass seasonally from the Atlantic to the Pacific driving coastal upwelling in the Tropical Eastern Pacific. This paper determines if seasonal upwelling was present in five Pliocene and Pleistocene fossiliferous sites on the Pacific coast of the Burica region of the Isthmus of Panama using two independent approaches that compare bryozoan morphology and whole community composition of fossiliferous localities with material from upwelling and non-upwelling modern localities. No definitive evidence of seasonal upwelling exists in the Pliocene, implying non-analogous oceanographic conditions because of continued interoceanic connection prior to the closure of the Isthmus of Panama. Data from three mid-Pleistocene sites reveal robust evidence of strong seasonal upwelling suggesting that the elevation of the Isthmus must have been sufficiently low to permit wind-jets to form. A low-elevation Isthmus of Panama may have persisted until as recently as the mid-Pleistocene.
Embryonic brooding and clonal propagation in tropical eastern Pacific cupuladriid bryozoansO'Dea, AaronOstrovsky, Andrew N.Rodriguez, Felix2010DOI: info:10.1017/S0025315409000940Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdomv. 90No. 2291299291–2990025-3154
O'Dea, Aaron, Ostrovsky, Andrew N., and Rodriguez, Felix. 2010. "Embryonic brooding and clonal propagation in tropical eastern Pacific cupuladriid bryozoans." Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 90 (2):291–299. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0025315409000940
ID: 90741
Type: article
Authors: O'Dea, Aaron; Ostrovsky, Andrew N.; Rodriguez, Felix
Keywords: STRI; CTPA; Center for Tropical Palaeoecology and Archaeology
Abstract: Colonial invertebrates often mix sexual and asexual methods of propagation, and a comprehensive understanding of both is required for life history study. The asexual cloning of new colonies in cupuladriid bryozoans is much better studied than the formation of new colonies by sexual reproduction. As such, the relative investments of sexual and asexual modes of propagation remain uncertain. This preliminary study explores patterns of embryonic brooding as a measure of investment into sexual reproduction. We conduct a survey of quantity and arrangement of embryos in tropical eastern Pacific cupuladriid colonies and compare this to the frequency of cloning. Species populations show considerable variation in embryonic brooding. Patterns of brooding, both across and within species strongly support the hypothesis that as cloning increases, investment into sexual reproduction decreases. We find preliminary evidence that individual cupuladriid colonies that propagate sexually may senesce like solitary organisms, while species that regularly clone only appear to experience senescence at the level of the zooid.
Comparative anatomy of internal incubational sacs in cupuladriid bryozoans and the evolution of brooding in free-living cheilostomesOstrovsky, Andrew N.O'Dea, AaronRodriguez, Felix2009DOI: info:10.1002/jmor.10767Journal of Morphologyv. 270No. 12141314301413–14300362-2525
Ostrovsky, Andrew N., O'Dea, Aaron, and Rodriguez, Felix. 2009. "Comparative anatomy of internal incubational sacs in cupuladriid bryozoans and the evolution of brooding in free-living cheilostomes." Journal of Morphology 270 (12):1413–1430. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmor.10767
ID: 80892
Type: article
Authors: Ostrovsky, Andrew N.; O'Dea, Aaron; Rodriguez, Felix
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Numerous gross morphological attributes are shared among unrelated free-living bryozoans revealing convergent evolution associated with functional demands of living on soft sediments. Here, we show that the reproductive structures across free-living groups evolved convergently. The most prominent convergent traits are the collective reduction of external brood chambers (ovicells) and the acquisition of internal brooding. Anatomical studies of four species from the cheilostome genera Cupuladria and Discoporella (Cupuladriidae) show that these species incubate their embryos in internal brooding sacs located in the coelom of the maternal nonpolymorphic autozooids. This sac consists of a main chamber and a narrow neck communicating to the vestibulum. The distal wall of the vestibulum possesses a cuticular thickening, which may further isolate the brood cavity. The presence of this character in all four species strongly supports grouping Cupuladria and Discoporella in one taxon. Further evidence suggests that the Cupuladriidae may be nested within the Calloporidae. Based on the structure of brooding organs, two scenarios are proposed to explain the evolution of the internal brooding in cupuladriids. The evolution of brood chambers and their origin in other free-living cheilostomes is discussed. Unlike the vast majority of Neocheilostomina, almost all free-living cheilostomes possess nonprominent chambers for embryonic incubation, either endozooidal and immersed ovicells or internal brooding sacs, supporting the idea that internal embryonic incubation is derived. We speculate that prominent skeletal brood chambers are disadvantageous to a free-living mode of life that demands easy movement through sediment in instable sea-floor settings. J. Morphol., 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Modes of reproduction in Recent and fossil cupuladriid bryozoansO'Dea, AaronJackson, Jeremy B. C.Taylor, Paul D.Rodriguez, Felix2008DOI: info:10.1111/j.1475-4983.2008.00790.xPalaeontologyv. 41No. 4847864847–8640031-0239
O'Dea, Aaron, Jackson, Jeremy B. C., Taylor, Paul D., and Rodriguez, Felix. 2008. "Modes of reproduction in Recent and fossil cupuladriid bryozoans." Palaeontology 41 (4):847–864. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-4983.2008.00790.x
ID: 74362
Type: article
Authors: O'Dea, Aaron; Jackson, Jeremy B. C.; Taylor, Paul D.; Rodriguez, Felix
Keywords: CTPA; Center for Tropical Palaeoecology and Archaeology; NH-EOL; STRI
Abstract: Cupuladriid cheilostome bryozoans can make new colonies both sexually and asexually. Sexual (aclonal) colonies are derived from larvae while asexual (clonal) colonies result from the fragmentation or division of larger colonies. A number of specialised morphologies exist which either enhance or discourage clonality, and cupuladriids preserve these in their skeletons, meaning that it is possible to count the abundances of individual modes of reproduction in fossil assemblages, and thus measure the mode and tempo of evolution of life histories using fossil colonies. In this paper we categorise, illustrate and describe the various clonal and aclonal methods of propagation in cupuladriids through the Cenozoic. Sexual reproduction is the only aclonal method of propagation, while four clonal methods are described comprising: (1) mechanical fragmentation, (2) autofragmentation, (3) colonial budding and (4) peripheral fragmentation. The processes involved in each are discussed and we explain how their prevalence can be measured in the fossil record using preservable morphologies. Compiling a record of the occurrence and distribution of the various modes of propagation through time and space we discover a general trend of evolution towards more complex modes in all three cupuladriid genera, but a geologically recent extinction of some modes of propagation that has left the present-day assemblage relatively depauperate. We see striking similarities in the general timing of expansion of modes of reproduction between the two most important genera, Cupuladria and Discoporella, although it is clear that Discoporella evolved a much wider range of special morphologies either to enhance or to discourage clonality than did Cupuladria.
La paleontología marina en el Istmo de PanamáO'Dea, AaronRodriguez, FelixDeGracia, CarlosCoates, Anthony G.2007Canto Rodadov. 2149179149–1791818-2917
O'Dea, Aaron, Rodriguez, Felix, DeGracia, Carlos, and Coates, Anthony G. 2007. "La paleontología marina en el Istmo de Panamá." Canto Rodado 2:149–179.
ID: 55620
Type: article
Authors: O'Dea, Aaron; Rodriguez, Felix; DeGracia, Carlos; Coates, Anthony G.
Keywords: CTPA; Center for Tropical Palaeoecology and Archaeology; NH-EOL; STRI
Abstract: The Isthmus of Panama contains an extremely rich fossil record that has enabled paleontologists to assemble a fascinating account of how the Isthmus formed, and what the environmental, ecological and evolutionary consequences of its formation were to life in the seas of Tropical America. In this paper we celebrate 20 years of the Panama Paleontology Project (PPP) with an account of marine paleontology on the Isthmus with the aim of stimulating interest in students and researchers into the currently understudied world of tropical paleontology. We summarize over 100 years of paleontological research on the Isthmus of Panama, present the most up-to-date model of Isthmus formation, and describe the origins of the Caribbean and Pacific environments that prevail today. We provide a short review of the history of paleontological research on the Isthmus, illustrate the significance of Isthmian paleontological research for understanding the origin of life in Tropical American seas today, and highlight the potentials for future research. We describe the most appropriate techniques for collecting marine fossils in the region and the best ways to manage collections. Finally, we present three geological formations (the Late Miocene Gatun formation, the Pliocene Cayo Agua formation and the Plio-Pleistocene Burica formation) that occur on the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of the Isthmus. For each formation the location of outcrops, their sedimentology and their ages are presented alongside geological and paleontological evidence that describes their depositional environment. For each formation, we list areas where fossils can easily be collected, illustrate those fossils commonly found and discuss their environmental, ecological and evolutionary significance.
Response of zooid size in Cupuladria exfragminis (Bryozoa) to simulated upwelling temperaturesO'Dea, AaronRodriguez, FelixRomero, Tania2007DOI: info:10.1111/j.1439-0485.2006.00144.xMarine Ecologyv. 28No. 2315315
O'Dea, Aaron, Rodriguez, Felix, and Romero, Tania. 2007. "Response of zooid size in Cupuladria exfragminis (Bryozoa) to simulated upwelling temperatures." Marine Ecology 28 (2):315. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0485.2006.00144.x
ID: 55621
Type: article
Authors: O'Dea, Aaron; Rodriguez, Felix; Romero, Tania
Keywords: CTPA; Center for Tropical Palaeoecology and Archaeology; NH-EOL; STRI
Abstract: Abstract We investigate the effect of the temperature-size rule upon zooids of the tropical American bryozoan Cupuladria exfragminis. Results show that mean zooid length, zooid width and zooid area vary significantly between clonal replicates of C. exfragminis kept under different controlled temperature conditions. Significantly larger zooids are produced during times of lowered water temperature that are comparable with the temperatures that occur during seasonal upwelling along the Pacific coast of Panama where the animal lives in abundance. Interpolation of data suggests that a drop of 1 oC causes a 5% increase in zooid size, and that almost all variation in zooid size in natural populations can be explained by temperature. Results are discussed in context of the potential use of zooid size variation in cupuladriid bryozoans to measure the strength of seasonal upwelling in ancient seas by analysing zooid size changes in fossil colonies. The technique of cloning cupuladriid colonies by fragmentation is also discussed with reference to its benefits in experimental studies where genotypes need to be controlled or replicated.
Los moluscos marinos de Panamá Viejo. Selectividad de recursos desde una perspectiva de larga duraciónMartin-Rincon, J.Rodriguez, Felix2006Canto Rodadov. 1No. 18510085–1001818-2917
Martin-Rincon, J. and Rodriguez, Felix. 2006. "Los moluscos marinos de Panamá Viejo. Selectividad de recursos desde una perspectiva de larga duración." Canto Rodado 1 (1):85–100.
ID: 110842
Type: article
Authors: Martin-Rincon, J.; Rodriguez, Felix
Keywords: STRI