Publication Search Results

Search Results

Showing 1-20 of about 110 results.
First host plant record for Pacarina (Hemiptera, Cicadidae)Aiello, AnnetteStucky, Brian J.2020DOI: info:10.3897/neotropical.15.e49013Neotropical Biology and Conservationv. 15No. 1778877–882236-3777
Aiello, Annette and Stucky, Brian J. 2020. "First host plant record for Pacarina (Hemiptera, Cicadidae)." Neotropical Biology and Conservation 15 (1):77–88. https://doi.org/10.3897/neotropical.15.e49013
ID: 155018
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette; Stucky, Brian J.
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Twenty-nine Pacarina (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) adults, 12 males and 17 females, emerged from the soil of a potted Dracaena trifasciata (Asparagaceae) in Arraiján, Republic of Panama, providing the first rearing records and the first definitive host plant records for any species of Pacarina. These reared Pacarina appear to be morphologically distinct from all known species of Pacarina and likely represent an undescribed species. In light of this finding, we also discuss the taxonomy, biogeography, and ecology of Pacarina.
Amorphosoma penicillatum (Klug, 1827) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Agrilinae): A Fearless Jewel Beetle in PanamaAiello, Annette2019DOI: info:10.1649/0010-065X-73.4.1102The Coleopterists Bulletinv. 73No. 4110211041102–11040010-065X
Aiello, Annette. 2019. "Amorphosoma penicillatum (Klug, 1827) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: Agrilinae): A Fearless Jewel Beetle in Panama." The Coleopterists Bulletin 73 (4):1102–1104. https://doi.org/10.1649/0010-065X-73.4.1102
ID: 155347
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette
Keywords: STRI
Hylesia umbrata (Saturniidae: Hemileucinae): A MysteryAiello, AnnetteYoung, Victor2018DOI: info:10.18473/lepi.72i1.a4Journal of the Lepidopterists' Societyv. 72No. 1354335–430024-0966
Aiello, Annette and Young, Victor. 2018. "Hylesia umbrata (Saturniidae: Hemileucinae): A Mystery." Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 72 (1):35–43. https://doi.org/10.18473/lepi.72i1.a4
ID: 145630
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette; Young, Victor
Keywords: STRI
The Saturniidae of Barro Colorado Island, Panama: A model taxon for studying the long-term effects of climate change?Basset, YvesLamarre, Greg P. A.Ratz, TomSegar, Simon T.Decaens, ThibaudRougerie, RodolpheMiller, Scott E.Perez, FilonilaBobadilla, RicardoLopez, YacksecariAlejandro Ramirez, JoseAiello, AnnetteBarrios, Hector2017DOI: info:10.1002/ece3.3515Ecology and Evolutionv. 7No. 239991100049991–100042045-7758
Basset, Yves, Lamarre, Greg P. A., Ratz, Tom, Segar, Simon T., Decaens, Thibaud, Rougerie, Rodolphe, Miller, Scott E., Perez, Filonila, Bobadilla, Ricardo, Lopez, Yacksecari, Alejandro Ramirez, Jose, Aiello, Annette, and Barrios, Hector. 2017. "The Saturniidae of Barro Colorado Island, Panama: A model taxon for studying the long-term effects of climate change?." Ecology and Evolution 7 (23):9991–10004. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3515
ID: 144889
Type: article
Authors: Basset, Yves; Lamarre, Greg P. A.; Ratz, Tom; Segar, Simon T.; Decaens, Thibaud; Rougerie, Rodolphe; Miller, Scott E.; Perez, Filonila; Bobadilla, Ricardo; Lopez, Yacksecari; Alejandro Ramirez, Jose; Aiello, Annette; Barrios, Hector
Keywords: NMNH; NH-Entomology; SI-Castle; STRI
Abstract: We have little knowledge of the response of invertebrate assemblages to climate change in tropical ecosystems, and few studies have compiled long-term data on invertebrates from tropical rainforests. We provide an updated list of the 72 species of Saturniidae moths collected on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, during the period 1958-2016. This list will serve as baseline data for assessing long-term changes of saturniids on BCI in the future, as 81% of the species can be identified by their unique DNA Barcode Index Number, including four cryptic species not yet formally described. A local species pool of 60 + species breeding on BCI appears plausible, but more cryptic species may be discovered in the future. We use monitoring data obtained by light trapping to analyze recent population trends on BCI for saturniid species that were relatively common during 2009-2016, a period representing >30 saturniid generations. The abundances of 11 species, of 14 tested, could be fitted to significant time-series models. While the direction of change in abundance was uncertain for most species, two species showed a significant increase over time, and forecast models also suggested continuing increases for most species during 2017-2018, as compared to the 2009 base year. Peaks in saturniid abundance were most conspicuous during El Nino and La Nina years. In addition to a species-specific approach, we propose a reproducible functional classification based on five functional traits to analyze the responses of species sharing similar functional attributes in a fluctuating climate. Our results suggest that the abundances of larger body-size species with good dispersal abilities may increase concomitantly with rising air temperature in the future, because short-lived adults may allocate less time to increasing body temperature for flight, leaving more time available for searching for mating partners or suitable oviposition sites.
Tropical caterpillar addictionAiello, AnnetteDyer, Lee A.Forister, Matthew L.2016DOI: info:10.1007/978-3-319-20457-4_991102Springer International Publishing91–1029783319204574
Aiello, Annette. 2016. "Tropical caterpillar addiction." in The lives of lepidopterists, edited by Dyer, Lee A. and Forister, Matthew L., 91–102. Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20457-4_9
ID: 138267
Type: chapter
Authors: Aiello, Annette
Keywords: STRI
Brachyplatys vahlii (Fabricius, 1787), an introduced bug from Asia: first report in the Western Hemisphere (Hemiptera: Plataspidae: Brachyplatidinae)Aiello, AnnetteSaltonstall, KristinYoung, Victor2016DOI: info:10.3391/bir.2016.5.1.02BioInvasions Records: International Journal of Field Research on Biological Invasionsv. 5No. 17127–122242-1300
Aiello, Annette, Saltonstall, Kristin, and Young, Victor. 2016. "Brachyplatys vahlii (Fabricius, 1787), an introduced bug from Asia: first report in the Western Hemisphere (Hemiptera: Plataspidae: Brachyplatidinae)." BioInvasions Records: International Journal of Field Research on Biological Invasions 5 (1):7–12. https://doi.org/10.3391/bir.2016.5.1.02
ID: 140443
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette; Saltonstall, Kristin; Young, Victor
Keywords: STRI
Cool Bands: Wing bands decrease rate of heating, but not equilibrium temperature in Anartia fatimaBrashears, JakeAiello, AnnetteSeymoure, Brett M.2016DOI: info:10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.01.007Journal of thermal biologyv. 56100108100–1080306-4565
Brashears, Jake, Aiello, Annette, and Seymoure, Brett M. 2016. "Cool Bands: Wing bands decrease rate of heating, but not equilibrium temperature in Anartia fatima." Journal of thermal biology 56:100–108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.01.007
ID: 138623
Type: article
Authors: Brashears, Jake; Aiello, Annette; Seymoure, Brett M.
Keywords: fellow; STRI
Oncideres Serville (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Key to Too Few: 34 Species LostAiello, Annette2015DOI: info:10.1649/0010-065X-69.1.60The Coleopterists Bulletinv. 69No. 160600010-065X
Aiello, Annette. 2015. "Oncideres Serville (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Key to Too Few: 34 Species Lost." The Coleopterists Bulletin 69 (1):60. https://doi.org/10.1649/0010-065X-69.1.60
ID: 135296
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette
Keywords: STRI
The Butterflies of Barro Colorado Island, Panama: Local Extinction since the 1930sBasset, YvesBarrios, HéctorSegar, SimonSrygley, Robert B.Aiello, AnnetteWarren, Andrew D.Delgado, FranciscoCoronado, JamesLezcano, JorgeArizala, StephanyRivera, MarlenyPerez, FilonilaBobadilla, RicardoLopez, YacksecariRamirez, José Alejandro2015DOI: info:10.1371/journal.pone.0136623PloS Onev. 10No. 81221–221932-6203
Basset, Yves, Barrios, Héctor, Segar, Simon, Srygley, Robert B., Aiello, Annette, Warren, Andrew D., Delgado, Francisco, Coronado, James, Lezcano, Jorge, Arizala, Stephany, Rivera, Marleny, Perez, Filonila, Bobadilla, Ricardo, Lopez, Yacksecari, and Ramirez, José Alejandro. 2015. "The Butterflies of Barro Colorado Island, Panama: Local Extinction since the 1930s." PloS One 10 (8):1–22. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136623
ID: 137180
Type: article
Authors: Basset, Yves; Barrios, Héctor; Segar, Simon; Srygley, Robert B.; Aiello, Annette; Warren, Andrew D.; Delgado, Francisco; Coronado, James; Lezcano, Jorge; Arizala, Stephany; Rivera, Marleny; Perez, Filonila; Bobadilla, Ricardo; Lopez, Yacksecari; Ramirez, José Alejandro
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Few data are available about the regional or local extinction of tropical butterfly species. When confirmed, local extinction was often due to the loss of host-plant species. We used published lists and recent monitoring programs to evaluate changes in butterfly composition on Barro Colorado Island (BCI, Panama) between an old (1923-1943) and a recent (1993-2013) period. Although 601 butterfly species have been recorded from BCI during the 1923-2013 period, we estimate that 390 species are currently breeding on the island, including 34 cryptic species, currently only known by their DNA Barcode Index Number. Twenty-three butterfly species that were considered abundant during the old period could not be collected during the recent period, despite a much higher sampling effort in recent times. We consider these species locally extinct from BCI and they conservatively represent 6% of the estimated local pool of resident species. Extinct species represent distant phylogenetic branches and several families. The butterfly traits most likely to influence the probability of extinction were host growth form, wing size and host specificity, independently of the phylogenetic relationships among butterfly species. On BCI, most likely candidates for extinction were small hesperiids feeding on herbs (35% of extinct species). However, contrary to our working hypothesis, extinction of these species on BCI cannot be attributed to loss of host plants. In most cases these host plants remain extant, but they probably subsist at lower or more fragmented densities. Coupled with low dispersal power, this reduced availability of host plants has probably caused the local extinction of some butterfly species. Many more bird than butterfly species have been lost from BCI recently, confirming that small preserves may be far more effective at conserving invertebrates than vertebrates and, therefore, should not necessarily be neglected from a conservation viewpoint.
Differential Sequestration of a Cytotoxic Vismione from the Host Plant Vismia baccifera by Periphoba arcaei and Pyrrhopyge thericlesRaudsepp-Hearne, CiaraAiello, AnnetteHussein, Ahmed A.Heller, Maria V.Johns, TimothyCapson, Todd L.2015DOI: info:10.1007/s10886-015-0614-6Journal of Chemical Ecologyv. 41No. 9816821816–8210098-0331
Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara, Aiello, Annette, Hussein, Ahmed A., Heller, Maria V., Johns, Timothy, and Capson, Todd L. 2015. "Differential Sequestration of a Cytotoxic Vismione from the Host Plant Vismia baccifera by Periphoba arcaei and Pyrrhopyge thericles." Journal of Chemical Ecology 41 (9):816–821. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-015-0614-6
ID: 137257
Type: article
Authors: Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara; Aiello, Annette; Hussein, Ahmed A.; Heller, Maria V.; Johns, Timothy; Capson, Todd L.
Keywords: STRI
Keeping the Band Together: Evidence for False Boundary Disruptive Coloration in a ButterflySeymoure, Brett M.Aiello, Annette2015DOI: info:10.1111/jeb.12681Journal of Evolutionary Biologyv. 28No. 9161816241618–16241010-061X
Seymoure, Brett M. and Aiello, Annette. 2015. "Keeping the Band Together: Evidence for False Boundary Disruptive Coloration in a Butterfly." Journal of Evolutionary Biology 28 (9):1618–1624. https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12681
ID: 136464
Type: article
Authors: Seymoure, Brett M.; Aiello, Annette
Keywords: STRI
Leafhoppers (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) that probe human skin: A review of the world literature and nineteen new records, from PanamaDominguez, EdwinAiello, Annette2013DOI: info:10.1163/18749836-06001064Terrestrial Arthropod Reviewsv. 6No. 3201225201–2251874-9828
Dominguez, Edwin and Aiello, Annette. 2013. "Leafhoppers (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) that probe human skin: A review of the world literature and nineteen new records, from Panama." Terrestrial Arthropod Reviews 6 (3):201–225. https://doi.org/10.1163/18749836-06001064
ID: 116553
Type: article
Authors: Dominguez, Edwin; Aiello, Annette
Keywords: STRI
Reflections on viewing Lepidoptera specimens: a mirror deviceAiello, Annette2011News of the Lepidopterists' Societyv. 53No. 41111110091-1348
Aiello, Annette. 2011. "Reflections on viewing Lepidoptera specimens: a mirror device." News of the Lepidopterists' Society 53 (4):111.
ID: 110119
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette
Keywords: STRI
Caterpillar abundance and parasitism in a seasonally dry versus wet tropical forest of PanamaConnahs, HeidiAiello, AnnetteVan Bael, Sunshine A.Rodriguez-Castaneda, Genoveva2011DOI: info:10.1017/S0266467410000568Journal of Tropical Ecologyv. 27515851–580266-4674
Connahs, Heidi, Aiello, Annette, Van Bael, Sunshine A., and Rodriguez-Castaneda, Genoveva. 2011. "Caterpillar abundance and parasitism in a seasonally dry versus wet tropical forest of Panama." Journal of Tropical Ecology 27:51–58. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467410000568
ID: 98704
Type: article
Authors: Connahs, Heidi; Aiello, Annette; Van Bael, Sunshine A.; Rodriguez-Castaneda, Genoveva
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Rainfall seasonality can strongly influence biotic interactions by affecting host plant quality, and thus potentially regulating herbivore exposure to natural enemies. Plant defences are predicted to increase from dry to wet forests, rendering wet-forest caterpillars more vulnerable to parasitoids due to the slow-growth-high-mortality hypothesis. We collected and reared caterpillars from the understorey and trail edges of a wet forest and a seasonally dry forest to determine whether wet-forest caterpillars suffered a higher prevalence of parasitism and were less abundant than dry-forest caterpillars. In the two forests, caterpillar abundances (on average 8 h(-1)) and prevalence of parasitism (18%) were very similar regardless of feeding niche for both parasitism (27% versus 29% in shelter builders, and 16% versus 11% in external feeders) and caterpillar abundances (shelter builders: 1.42 versus 2.39, and external feeders: 8.27 versus 5.49 caterpillars h(-1)) in the dry and wet forests, respectively. A similar comparative analysis conducted in the canopy and understorey of the dry forest revealed a higher prevalence of parasitism in the canopy (43%) despite caterpillar densities similar to those in the understorey. Overall, shelter builders suffered higher parasitism than external feeders (32% versus 14.9%), and were attacked primarily by flies, whereas external feeders were more vulnerable to attack by parasitoid wasps.
Nothing is Perfect: Biodegradable Packing Material as Food and Transportation for a Museum Pest, Lasioderma Serricorne (F.) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)Aiello, AnnetteDominguez, EdwinStockwell, Henry P.2010DOI: info:10.1649/0010-065X-64.3.256.12The Coleopterists Bulletinv. 64No. 3256257256–2570010-065X
Aiello, Annette, Dominguez, Edwin, and Stockwell, Henry P. 2010. "Nothing is Perfect: Biodegradable Packing Material as Food and Transportation for a Museum Pest, Lasioderma Serricorne (F.) (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)." The Coleopterists Bulletin 64 (3):256–257. https://doi.org/10.1649/0010-065X-64.3.256.12
ID: 93213
Type: article
Authors: Aiello, Annette; Dominguez, Edwin; Stockwell, Henry P.
Keywords: STRI
Ooencyrtus marcelloi sp. nov.(Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an egg parasitoid of Heliconiini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae) on passion vines (Malpighiales: Passifloraceae) in Central AmericaGuerrieri, EmilioHuigens, Martinus E.Estrada, CatalinaWoelke, Jozef B.de Rijk, MarjoleinFatouros, Nina E.Aiello, AnnetteNoyes, John S.2010Journal of Natural Historyv. 44No. 1-2818781–870022-2933
Guerrieri, Emilio, Huigens, Martinus E., Estrada, Catalina, Woelke, Jozef B., de Rijk, Marjolein, Fatouros, Nina E., Aiello, Annette, and Noyes, John S. 2010. "Ooencyrtus marcelloi sp. nov.(Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an egg parasitoid of Heliconiini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae) on passion vines (Malpighiales: Passifloraceae) in Central America." Journal of Natural History 44 (1-2):81–87.
ID: 98204
Type: article
Authors: Guerrieri, Emilio; Huigens, Martinus E.; Estrada, Catalina; Woelke, Jozef B.; de Rijk, Marjolein; Fatouros, Nina E.; Aiello, Annette; Noyes, John S.
Keywords: STRI
A tale of two species: detritivory, parapatry, and sexual dimorphism in Lamprospilus collucia and L. orcidia(Lycaenidae: Theclinae: Eumaeini)Robbins, Robert K.Aiello, AnnetteFeinstein, JulieBerkov, AmyCaldas, AstridBusby, Robert C.Duarte, Marcelo2010Journal of Research on the Lepidopterav. 42647364–730022-4324
Robbins, Robert K., Aiello, Annette, Feinstein, Julie, Berkov, Amy, Caldas, Astrid, Busby, Robert C., and Duarte, Marcelo. 2010. "A tale of two species: detritivory, parapatry, and sexual dimorphism in Lamprospilus collucia and L. orcidia(Lycaenidae: Theclinae: Eumaeini)." Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera 42:64–73.
ID: 81834
Type: article
Authors: Robbins, Robert K.; Aiello, Annette; Feinstein, Julie; Berkov, Amy; Caldas, Astrid; Busby, Robert C.; Duarte, Marcelo
Keywords: STRI; NMNH; NH-Entomology
Molecular evidence for a diverse green algal community growing in the hair of sloths and a specific association with Trichophilus welckeri (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)Suutari, MillaMajaneva, MarkusFewers, David P.Voirin, BrysonAiello, AnnetteFriedl, ThomasChiarello, Adriano G.Blomster, Jaanika2010BMC Evolutionary Biologyv. 10869886–981471-2148
Suutari, Milla, Majaneva, Markus, Fewers, David P., Voirin, Bryson, Aiello, Annette, Friedl, Thomas, Chiarello, Adriano G., and Blomster, Jaanika. 2010. "Molecular evidence for a diverse green algal community growing in the hair of sloths and a specific association with Trichophilus welckeri (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)." BMC Evolutionary Biology 10:86–98.
ID: 90758
Type: article
Authors: Suutari, Milla; Majaneva, Markus; Fewers, David P.; Voirin, Bryson; Aiello, Annette; Friedl, Thomas; Chiarello, Adriano G.; Blomster, Jaanika
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Background: Sloths are slow-moving arboreal mammals inhabiting tropical rainforests in Central and South America. The six living species of sloths are occasionally reported to display a greenish discoloration of their pelage. Trichophilus welckeri, a green algal species first described more than a century ago, is widely believed to discolor the animals fur and provide the sloth with effective camouflage. However, this phenomenon has not been explored in any detail and there is little evidence to substantiate this widely held opinion. Results: Here we investigate the genetic diversity of the eukaryotic community present in fur of all six extant species of sloth. Analysis of 71 sloth hair samples yielding 426 partial 18S rRNA gene sequences demonstrates a diverse eukaryotic microbial assemblage. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that sloth fur hosts a number of green algal species and suggests that acquisition of these organisms from the surrounding rainforest plays an important role in the discoloration of sloth fur. However, an alga corresponding to the morphological description of Trichophilus welckeri was found to be frequent and abundant on sloth fur. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the retention of this alga on the fur of sloths independent of geographic location. Conclusions: These results demonstrate a unique diverse microbial eukaryotic community in the fur of sloths from Central and South America. Our analysis streghtens the case for symbiosis between sloths and Trichophilus welckeri.
Reverse color sequence in the diffraction of white light by the wing of the male butterfly Pierella luna (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae)Vigneron, Jean PolSimonis, PriscillaAiello, AnnetteBay, AnnickWindsor, Donald M.Colomer, Jean-FrancoisRassart, Marie2010DOI: info:10.1103/PhysRevE.82.021903Physical Review Ev. 82No. 2021903021903021903–0219031539-3755
Vigneron, Jean Pol, Simonis, Priscilla, Aiello, Annette, Bay, Annick, Windsor, Donald M., Colomer, Jean-Francois, and Rassart, Marie. 2010. "Reverse color sequence in the diffraction of white light by the wing of the male butterfly Pierella luna (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae)." Physical Review E 82 (2):021903–021903. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.82.021903
ID: 92244
Type: article
Authors: Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla; Aiello, Annette; Bay, Annick; Windsor, Donald M.; Colomer, Jean-Francois; Rassart, Marie
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: The butterfly Pierella luna (Nymphalidae) shows an intriguing rainbow iridescence effect: the forewings of the male, when illuminated along the axis from the body to the wing tip, decompose a white light beam as a diffraction grating would do. Violet light, however, emerges along a grazing angle, near the wing surface, while the other colors, from blue to red, exit respectively at angles progressively closer to the direction perpendicular to the wing plane. This sequence is the reverse of the usual decomposition of light by a grating with a periodicity parallel to the wing surface. It is shown that this effect is produced by a macroscopic deformation of the entire scale, which curls in such a way that it forms a "vertical" grating, perpendicular to the wing surface, and functions in transmission instead of reflection.
Ecological and evolutionary bioprospecting: using aposemantic insects as guides to rainforest plants active against diseaseHelson, Julie E.Capson, Todd L.Johns, TimothyAiello, AnnetteWindsor, Donald M.2009DOI: info:10.1890/070189Frontiers in Ecology and the Environmentv. 7No. 3130134130–1341540-9295
Helson, Julie E., Capson, Todd L., Johns, Timothy, Aiello, Annette, and Windsor, Donald M. 2009. "Ecological and evolutionary bioprospecting: using aposemantic insects as guides to rainforest plants active against disease." Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 7 (3):130–134. https://doi.org/10.1890/070189
ID: 74288
Type: article
Authors: Helson, Julie E.; Capson, Todd L.; Johns, Timothy; Aiello, Annette; Windsor, Donald M.
Keywords: NH-EOL; STRI
Abstract: We examined Coleoptera and Lepidoptera assemblages feeding on two different groups of plants: one in which plants were active against cancer cell lines and/or protozoan parasites responsible for tropical parasitic diseases, and a second group that was inactive in the same bioassays. Aposematic species were found on nine of the ten active plant species, but on only four of the ten inactive plant species. Non-aposematic insects did not show a significant difference in their association with active versus inactive plants. Our results suggest that the presence of aposematic, herbivorous insects can be used to facilitate the identification of plants with compounds active against important human diseases.