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Showing 1-14 of about 14 results.
Long-Term Impacts of Invasive Insects and Pathogens on Composition, Biomass, and Diversity of Forests in Virginia's Blue Ridge MountainsAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Herrmann, ValentineCass, Wendy B.Williams, Alan B.Paull, Stephen J.Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B.Helcoski, RyanTepley, Alan J.Bourg, Norman A.Cosma, Christopher T.Ferson, Abigail E.Kittle, CarolineMeakem, VictoriaMcGregor, Ian R.Prestipino, Maya N.Scott, Michael K.Terrell, Alyssa R.Alonso, AlfonsoDallmeier, FranciscoMcShea, William J.2020DOI: info:10.1007/s10021-020-00503-wEcosystems1432-9840
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Herrmann, Valentine, Cass, Wendy B., Williams, Alan B., Paull, Stephen J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B., Helcoski, Ryan, Tepley, Alan J., Bourg, Norman A., Cosma, Christopher T., Ferson, Abigail E., Kittle, Caroline, Meakem, Victoria, McGregor, Ian R., Prestipino, Maya N., Scott, Michael K., Terrell, Alyssa R., Alonso, Alfonso, Dallmeier, Francisco, and McShea, William J. 2020. "Long-Term Impacts of Invasive Insects and Pathogens on Composition, Biomass, and Diversity of Forests in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains." Ecosystems https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-020-00503-w
ID: 155476
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Herrmann, Valentine; Cass, Wendy B.; Williams, Alan B.; Paull, Stephen J.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B.; Helcoski, Ryan; Tepley, Alan J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Cosma, Christopher T.; Ferson, Abigail E.; Kittle, Caroline; Meakem, Victoria; McGregor, Ian R.; Prestipino, Maya N.; Scott, Michael K.; Terrell, Alyssa R.; Alonso, Alfonso; Dallmeier, Francisco; McShea, William J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Abstract: Exotic forest insects and pathogens (EFIP) have become regular features of temperate forest ecosystems, yet we lack a long-term perspective on their net impacts on tree mortality, carbon sequestration, and tree species diversity. Here, we analyze 3 decades (1987-2019) of forest monitoring data from the Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregion in eastern North America, including 67 plots totaling 29.4 ha, along with a historical survey from 1939. Over the past century, EFIP substantially affected at least eight tree genera. Tree host taxa had anomalously high mortality rates (>= 6% year(-1) from 2008 to 2019 vs 1.4% year(-1) for less-impacted taxa). Following the arrival of EFIP, affected taxa declined in abundance (- 25 to - 100%) and live aboveground biomass (AGB; - 13 to - 100%) within our monitoring plots. We estimate that EFIP were responsible for 21-29% of ecosystem AGB loss through mortality (- 87 g m(-2) year(-1)) from 1991 to 2013 across 66 sites. Over a century, net AGB loss among affected species totaled roughly 6.6-10 kg m(-2). The affected host taxa accounted for 23-29% of genera losses at the plot scale, with mixed net effects on alpha-diversity. Several taxa were lost from our monitoring plots but not completely extirpated from the region. Despite these losses, both total AGB and alpha-diversity were largely recovered through increases in sympatric genera. These results indicate that EFIP have been an important force shaping forest composition, carbon cycling, and diversity. At the same time, less-affected taxa in these relatively diverse temperate forests have conferred substantial resilience with regard to biomass and alpha-diversity.
Mapping carbon accumulation potential from global natural forest regrowthCook-Patton, SusanLeavitt, Sara M.Gibbs, DavidHarris, Nancy L.Lister, KristineAnderson-Teixeira, KristinaBriggs, Russell D.Chazdon, Robin L.Crowther, Thomas W.Ellis, Peter W.Griscom, Heather P.Herrmann, ValentineHoll, Karen D.Houghton, Richard A.Larrosa, CeciliaLomax, GuyLucas, RichardMadsen, PalleMalhi, YadvinderPaquette, AlainParker, John D.Paul, KerynRouth, DevinRoxburgh, StephenSaatchi, Sassanvan den Hoogen, JohanWalker, Wayne S.Wheeler, Charlotte E.Wood, Stephen A.Xu, LiangGriscom, Bronson W.2020DOI: info:10.1038/s41586-020-2686-xNaturev. 585No. 7826545550545–5500028-0836
Cook-Patton, Susan, Leavitt, Sara M., Gibbs, David, Harris, Nancy L., Lister, Kristine, Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina, Briggs, Russell D., Chazdon, Robin L., Crowther, Thomas W., Ellis, Peter W., Griscom, Heather P., Herrmann, Valentine, Holl, Karen D., Houghton, Richard A., Larrosa, Cecilia, Lomax, Guy, Lucas, Richard, Madsen, Palle, Malhi, Yadvinder, Paquette, Alain, Parker, John D., Paul, Keryn, Routh, Devin, Roxburgh, Stephen, Saatchi, Sassan et al. 2020. "Mapping carbon accumulation potential from global natural forest regrowth." Nature 585 (7826):545–550. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2686-x
ID: 157060
Type: article
Authors: Cook-Patton, Susan; Leavitt, Sara M.; Gibbs, David; Harris, Nancy L.; Lister, Kristine; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina; Briggs, Russell D.; Chazdon, Robin L.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Ellis, Peter W.; Griscom, Heather P.; Herrmann, Valentine; Holl, Karen D.; Houghton, Richard A.; Larrosa, Cecilia; Lomax, Guy; Lucas, Richard; Madsen, Palle; Malhi, Yadvinder; Paquette, Alain; Parker, John D.; Paul, Keryn; Routh, Devin; Roxburgh, Stephen; Saatchi, Sassan; van den Hoogen, Johan; Walker, Wayne S.; Wheeler, Charlotte E.; Wood, Stephen A.; Xu, Liang; Griscom, Bronson W.
Keywords: SERC; STRI; NZP
Management Regime and Field Age Affect Species Richness and Cover of Native Forbs and Exotic Species in Virginia GrasslandsLedvina, JosephMcShea, William J.Bourg, Norman A.Herrmann, ValentineAkre, ThomasJohnson, Amy E. M.2020DOI: info:10.3368/er.38.2.83Ecological Restorationv. 38No. 2839383–931543-4060
Ledvina, Joseph, McShea, William J., Bourg, Norman A., Herrmann, Valentine, Akre, Thomas, and Johnson, Amy E. M. 2020. "Management Regime and Field Age Affect Species Richness and Cover of Native Forbs and Exotic Species in Virginia Grasslands." Ecological Restoration 38 (2):83–93. https://doi.org/10.3368/er.38.2.83
ID: 155892
Type: article
Authors: Ledvina, Joseph; McShea, William J.; Bourg, Norman A.; Herrmann, Valentine; Akre, Thomas; Johnson, Amy E. M.
Keywords: NZP
Abstract: The majority of grasslands in the eastern United States are maintained through agricultural use (livestock grazing and hay production), intermittent management as fallow fields, or active management for ecological or recreational purposes. Management following agricultural use can follow a variety of practices from benign neglect to active planting of native grasses and forbs. We surveyed 64 grasslands in a 15-county region of northwestern Virginia to assess their plant species composition, with emphasis on the response of exotic species and native forb species richness to time since agricultural use. With regard to agricultural use, we found that livestock grazing resulted in low levels of native species richness and increased exotic species prevalence, while hay production increased native forb richness. In these fields, eutrophication (as measured by phosphorus levels) was a strong positive predictor of exotic species. Post-agricultural fields, maintained through mowing (fallow), retained native species but also experienced sharp increases in exotic species. When post-agricultural management included the establishment of native grasses and forbs, a higher initial richness of native species resulted. However, fields disked during establishment lost native species and gained exotic species with increasing field age; an outcome not observed when field establishment did not involve disking. The management practices applied to post-agricultural fields significantly impact their ability to support biodiversity, their propensity to harbor exotic species, and their ability to maintain native diversity and resist invasions of exotic species with increasing age since abandonment.
Tree height and leaf drought tolerance traits shape growth responses across droughts in a temperate broadleaf forestMcGregor, Ian R.Helcoski, RyanKunert, NorbertTepley, Alan J.Gonzalez‐Akre, Erika B.Herrmann, ValentineZailaa, JosephStovall, Atticus E. L.Bourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Pederson, NeilSack, LawrenAnderson‐Teixeira, Kristina J.2020DOI: info:10.1111/nph.16996New Phytologist0028-646X
McGregor, Ian R., Helcoski, Ryan, Kunert, Norbert, Tepley, Alan J., Gonzalez‐Akre, Erika B., Herrmann, Valentine, Zailaa, Joseph, Stovall, Atticus E. L., Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Pederson, Neil, Sack, Lawren, and Anderson‐Teixeira, Kristina J. 2020. "Tree height and leaf drought tolerance traits shape growth responses across droughts in a temperate broadleaf forest." New Phytologist https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.16996
ID: 157275
Type: article
Authors: McGregor, Ian R.; Helcoski, Ryan; Kunert, Norbert; Tepley, Alan J.; Gonzalez‐Akre, Erika B.; Herrmann, Valentine; Zailaa, Joseph; Stovall, Atticus E. L.; Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Pederson, Neil; Sack, Lawren; Anderson‐Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Growing season moisture drives interannual variation in woody productivity of a temperate deciduous forestHelcoski, RyanTepley, Alan J.Pederson, NeilMcGarvey, Jennifer C.Meakem, VictoriaHerrmann, ValentineThompson, Jonathan R.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2019DOI: info:10.1111/nph.15906New Phytologistv. 223No. 3120412161204–12160028-646X
Helcoski, Ryan, Tepley, Alan J., Pederson, Neil, McGarvey, Jennifer C., Meakem, Victoria, Herrmann, Valentine, Thompson, Jonathan R., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2019. "Growing season moisture drives interannual variation in woody productivity of a temperate deciduous forest." New Phytologist 223 (3):1204–1216. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15906
ID: 151333
Type: article
Authors: Helcoski, Ryan; Tepley, Alan J.; Pederson, Neil; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Meakem, Victoria; Herrmann, Valentine; Thompson, Jonathan R.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Abstract: 1.The climate sensitivity of forest ecosystem woody productivity (ANPPstem ) influences carbon cycle responses to climate change. For the first time, we combine long-term annual growth and forest census data of a diverse temperate broadleaf deciduous forest, seeking to resolve whether ANPPstem is primarily moisture- or energy-limited and whether climate sensitivity has changed in recent decades characterized by more mesic conditions and elevated CO2 . 2.We analyzed tree-ring chronologies across 109 years of monthly climatic variation (1901-2009) for 14 species representing 97% of ANPPstem in a 25.6-ha plot in northern Virginia, USA. 3.Radial growth of most species and ecosystem-level ANPPstem responded positively to cool, moist growing season conditions, but the same conditions in the previous May-July were associated with reduced growth. In recent decades (1980-2009), responses were more variable and on average, weaker. 4.Our results indicate that woody productivity is primarily limited by current growing season moisture, as opposed to temperature or sunlight, but additional complexity in climate sensitivity may reflect the use of stored carbohydrate reserves. Overall, while such forests currently display limited moisture sensitivity, their woody productivity is likely to decline under projected hotter and potentially drier growing season conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Effects of grassland management on overwintering bird communitiesJohnson, Amy E. M.Sillett, T. ScottLuther, DavidHerrmann, ValentineAkre, Thomas A.McShea, William J.2019DOI: info:10.1002/jwmg.21730Journal of Wildlife Managementv. 83No. 7151515261515–15260022-541X
Johnson, Amy E. M., Sillett, T. Scott, Luther, David, Herrmann, Valentine, Akre, Thomas A., and McShea, William J. 2019. "Effects of grassland management on overwintering bird communities." Journal of Wildlife Management 83 (7):1515–1526. https://doi.org/10.1002/jwmg.21730
ID: 151948
Type: article
Authors: Johnson, Amy E. M.; Sillett, T. Scott; Luther, David; Herrmann, Valentine; Akre, Thomas A.; McShea, William J.
Keywords: NZP
Abstract: Birds that depend on grassland and successional‐scrub vegetation communities are experiencing a greater decline than any other avian assemblage in North America. Habitat loss and degradation on breeding and wintering grounds are among the leading causes of these declines. We used public and private lands in northern Virginia, USA, to explore benefits of grassland management and associated field structure on supporting overwintering bird species from 2013 to 2016. Specifically, we used non‐metric multidimensional scaling and multispecies occupancy models to compare species richness and habitat associations of grassland‐obligate and successional‐scrub species during winter in fields comprised of native warm‐season grasses (WSG) or non‐native cool‐season grasses (CSG) that were managed at different times of the year. Results demonstrated positive correlations of grassland‐obligate species with decreased vegetation structure and a higher percentage of grass cover, whereas successional‐scrub species positively correlated with increased vegetation structure and height and increased percentages of woody stems, forb cover, and bare ground. Fields of WSG supported higher estimated total and target species richness compared to fields of CSG. Estimated species richness was also influenced by management timing, with fields managed during the previous winter or left unmanaged exhibiting higher estimated richness than fields managed in summer or fall. Warm‐season grass fields managed in the previous winter or left unmanaged had higher estimated species richness than any other treatment group. This study identifies important winter habitat associations (e.g., vegetation height and field openness) with species abundance and richness and can be used to make inferences about optimal management practices for overwintering avian species in eastern grasslands of North America. © 2019 The Authors. Journal of Wildlife Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Wildlife Society.
Metabarcoding reveals diet diversity in an ungulate community in ThailandMcShea, William J.Sukmasuang, RonglarpErickson, David L.Herrmann, ValentineNgoprasert, DusitBhumpakphan, NarisDavies, Stuart J.2019DOI: info:10.1111/btp.12720Biotropicav. 51No. 6923937923–9370006-3606
McShea, William J., Sukmasuang, Ronglarp, Erickson, David L., Herrmann, Valentine, Ngoprasert, Dusit, Bhumpakphan, Naris, and Davies, Stuart J. 2019. "Metabarcoding reveals diet diversity in an ungulate community in Thailand." Biotropica 51 (6):923–937. https://doi.org/10.1111/btp.12720
ID: 153361
Type: article
Authors: McShea, William J.; Sukmasuang, Ronglarp; Erickson, David L.; Herrmann, Valentine; Ngoprasert, Dusit; Bhumpakphan, Naris; Davies, Stuart J.
Keywords: NZP; STRI
Abstract: The diverse large mammal communities found in Asian dry forests and savannas should segregate based on their diet selection. We examined the diet composition of sympatric ungulate species using metabarcoding to determine whether their diet was segregated and whether obvious attributes (i.e., body size, phylogeny, ecology) explained the structure. We collected fecal samples from eight ungulate species in Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary in the western forest complex of Thailand. The fecal collections occurred around a plot where all woody species were codified within a genetic barcode library, and this library was supplemented with samples from plant species known to be consumed by these species. Of 273 plant species tested, at least 93 were found within the fecal samples. Over half of the identified species were not previously known by experts as forage species. All ungulate species showed a strong consumption of grasses and forbs. For the three species with sufficient sample size (sambar, banteng, and guar), there were seasonal differences in their diet, with each showing increased occurrence of woody plants during the dry season. The pattern of forage consumption did not follow obvious paradigms of body size or taxonomy, with significant diet differences found in two similar-sized bovids (gaur, banteng), while the diet of sambar was more similar to bovids than to the other deer species. Asian ungulates differ in their forage consumption and metabarcoding should allow for testing of diet shifts in response to seasonal rains and fires which dominate the phenology of Asian dry forests and savannas.
ForC: A global database of forest carbon stocks and fluxesAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.Wang, Maria M. H.McGarvey, Jennifer C.Herrmann, ValentineTepley, Alan J.Bond-Lamberty, BenLeBauer, David S.2018DOI: info:10.1002/ecy.2229Ecologyv. 99No. 6150715070012-9658
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., Wang, Maria M. H., McGarvey, Jennifer C., Herrmann, Valentine, Tepley, Alan J., Bond-Lamberty, Ben, and LeBauer, David S. 2018. "ForC: A global database of forest carbon stocks and fluxes." Ecology 99 (6):1507. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2229
ID: 146200
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Wang, Maria M. H.; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Herrmann, Valentine; Tepley, Alan J.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; LeBauer, David S.
Keywords: STRI; NZP
Abstract: Forests play an influential role in the global carbon (C) cycle, storing roughly half of terrestrial C and annually exchanging with the atmosphere more than ten times the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by anthropogenic activities. Yet, scaling up from field-based measurements of forest C stocks and fluxes to understand global scale C cycling and its climate sensitivity remains an important challenge. Tens of thousands of forest C measurements have been made, but these data have yet to be integrated into a single database that makes them accessible for integrated analyses. Here we present an open-access global Forest Carbon database (ForC) containing previously published records of field-based measurements of ecosystem-level C stocks and annual fluxes, along with disturbance history and methodological information. ForC expands upon the previously published tropical portion of this database, TropForC (DOI: 10.5061/dryad.t516f), now including 17,367 records (previously 3,568) representing 2,731 plots (previously 845) in 826 geographically distinct areas. The database covers all forested biogeographic and climate zones, represents forest stands of all ages, and currently includes data collected between 1934 and 2015. We expect that ForC will prove useful for macroecological analyses of forest C cycling, for evaluation of model predictions or remote sensing products, for quantifying the contribution of forests to the global C cycle, and for supporting international efforts to inventory forest carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. A dynamic version of ForC is maintained at on GitHub (https://GitHub.com/forc-db), and we encourage the research community to collaborate in updating, correcting, expanding, and utilizing this database. ForC is an open access database, and we encourage use of the data for scientific research and education purposes. Data may not be used for commercial purposes without written permission of the database PI. Any publications using ForC data should cite this publication and Anderson-Teixeira et al. 2016(a) (see Metadata S1). No other copyright or cost restrictions are associated with the use of this dataset. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Role of tree size in moist tropical forest carbon cycling and water deficit responsesMeakem, VictoriaTepley, Alan J.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaHerrmann, ValentineMuller-Landau, Helene C.Wright, S. JosephHubbell, Stephen P.Condit, Richard S.Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2018DOI: info:10.1111/nph.14633New Phytologistv. 219No. 3947958947–9580028-646X
Meakem, Victoria, Tepley, Alan J., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Herrmann, Valentine, Muller-Landau, Helene C., Wright, S. Joseph, Hubbell, Stephen P., Condit, Richard S., and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2018. "Role of tree size in moist tropical forest carbon cycling and water deficit responses." New Phytologist 219 (3):947–958. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14633
Interactive effects of deer exclusion and exotic plant removal on deciduous forest understory communitiesBourg, Norman A.McShea, William J.Herrmann, ValentineStewart, Chad M.2017DOI: info:10.1093/aobpla/plx046AoB PLANTSv. 9No. 52041-2851
Bourg, Norman A., McShea, William J., Herrmann, Valentine, and Stewart, Chad M. 2017. "Interactive effects of deer exclusion and exotic plant removal on deciduous forest understory communities." AoB PLANTS 9 (5):https://doi.org/10.1093/aobpla/plx046
ID: 148228
Type: article
Authors: Bourg, Norman A.; McShea, William J.; Herrmann, Valentine; Stewart, Chad M.
Keywords: NZP
Tree circumference dynamics over short time scales using automated dendrometer bands in four forestsHerrmann, ValentineMcMahon, Sean M.Detto, MatteoLutz, James A.Davies, Stuart J.Chang-Yang, Chia-HaoAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2016DOI: info:10.5479/data_serc/10088/30918​Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Herrmann, Valentine, McMahon, Sean M., Detto, Matteo, Lutz, James A., Davies, Stuart J., Chang-Yang, Chia-Hao, and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2016. [Dataset] "Tree circumference dynamics over short time scales using automated dendrometer bands in four forests." Distributed by ​Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. https://doi.org/10.5479/data_serc/10088/30918
Tree Circumference Dynamics in Four Forests Characterized Using Automated Dendrometer BandsHerrmann, ValentineMcMahon, Sean M.Detto, MatteoLutz, James A.Davies, Stuart JamesChang-Yang, ChiaAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.2016DOI: info:10.1371/journal.pone.0169020Plos Onev. 11No. 121201–201932-6203
Herrmann, Valentine, McMahon, Sean M., Detto, Matteo, Lutz, James A., Davies, Stuart James, Chang-Yang, Chia, and Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J. 2016. "Tree Circumference Dynamics in Four Forests Characterized Using Automated Dendrometer Bands." Plos One 11 (12):1–20. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0169020
Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forestAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.McGarvey, Jennifer C.Muller-Landau, Helene C.Park, Janice Y.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaHerrmann, ValentineBennett, Amy C.So, Christopher V.Bourg, Norman A.Thompson, Jonathan R.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.2015Dryad Digital Repository
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., McGarvey, Jennifer C., Muller-Landau, Helene C., Park, Janice Y., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Herrmann, Valentine, Bennett, Amy C., So, Christopher V., Bourg, Norman A., Thompson, Jonathan R., McMahon, Sean M., and McShea, William J. 2015. [Dataset] "Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forest." Distributed by Dryad Digital Repository.
ID: 153078
Type: dataset
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Park, Janice Y.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Herrmann, Valentine; Bennett, Amy C.; So, Christopher V.; Bourg, Norman A.; Thompson, Jonathan R.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.
Keywords: Dataset; NZP; SERC; STRI
Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forestAnderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.McGarvey, Jennifer C.Muller-Landau, Helene C.Park, Janice Y.Gonzalez-Akre, ErikaHerrmann, ValentineBennett, Amy C.So, Christopher V.Bourg, Norman A.Thompson, Jonathan R.McMahon, Sean M.McShea, William J.2015DOI: info:10.1111/1365-2435.12470Functional Ecologyv. 29No. 12158716021587–16020269-8463
Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J., McGarvey, Jennifer C., Muller-Landau, Helene C., Park, Janice Y., Gonzalez-Akre, Erika, Herrmann, Valentine, Bennett, Amy C., So, Christopher V., Bourg, Norman A., Thompson, Jonathan R., McMahon, Sean M., and McShea, William J. 2015. "Size-related scaling of tree form and function in a mixed-age forest." Functional Ecology 29 (12):1587–1602. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12470
ID: 136051
Type: article
Authors: Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Park, Janice Y.; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; Herrmann, Valentine; Bennett, Amy C.; So, Christopher V.; Bourg, Norman A.; Thompson, Jonathan R.; McMahon, Sean M.; McShea, William J.
Keywords: NZP; SERC; STRI