Publication Search Results

Search Results

Showing 1-20 of about 33 results.
Two New HATNet Hot Jupiters around A Stars and the First Glimpse at the Occurrence Rate of Hot Jupiters from TESSZhou, GeorgeHuang, C. X.Bakos, G. Á.Hartman, J. D.Latham, David W.Quinn, Samuel N.Collins, Karen A.Winn, J. N.Wong, I.Kovács, G.Csubry, Z.Bhatti, W.Penev, K.Bieryla, AllysonEsquerdo, Gilbert A.Berlind, PerryCalkins, Michael L.de Val-Borro, M.Noyes, R. W.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.Kovács, T.Buchhave, Lars A.Szklenar, T.Béky, B.Johnson, M. C.Cochran, W. D.Kniazev, A. Y.Stassun, K. G.Fulton, B. J.Shporer, A.Espinoza, N.Bayliss, D.Everett, M.Howell, S. B.Hellier, C.Anderson, D. R.Collier Cameron, A.West, R. G.Brown, D. J. A.Schanche, N.Barkaoui, K.Pozuelos, F.Gillon, M.Jehin, E.Benkhaldoun, Z.Daassou, A.Ricker, G.Vanderspek, R.Seager, S.Jenkins, J. M.Lissauer, Jack J.Armstrong, J. D.Collins, K. I.Gan, T.Hart, R.Horne, K.Kielkopf, J. F.Nielsen, L. D.Nishiumi, T.Narita, N.Palle, E.Relles, Howard M.Sefako, R.Tan, T. G.Davies, M.Goeke, Robert F.Guerrero, N.Haworth, K.Villanueva, S.DOI: info:10.3847/1538-3881/ab36b5v. 158141
Zhou, George, Huang, C. X., Bakos, G. Á., Hartman, J. D., Latham, David W., Quinn, Samuel N., Collins, Karen A., Winn, J. N., Wong, I., Kovács, G., Csubry, Z., Bhatti, W., Penev, K., Bieryla, Allyson, Esquerdo, Gilbert A., Berlind, Perry, Calkins, Michael L., de Val-Borro, M., Noyes, R. W., Lázár, J., Papp, I., Sári, P., Kovács, T., Buchhave, Lars A., Szklenar, T. et al. 2019. "Two New HATNet Hot Jupiters around A Stars and the First Glimpse at the Occurrence Rate of Hot Jupiters from TESS." The Astronomical Journal 158:141. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/ab36b5
ID: 154718
Type: article
Authors: Zhou, George; Huang, C. X.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Collins, Karen A.; Winn, J. N.; Wong, I.; Kovács, G.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; Penev, K.; Bieryla, Allyson; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.; Kovács, T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Szklenar, T.; Béky, B.; Johnson, M. C.; Cochran, W. D.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Stassun, K. G.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Espinoza, N.; Bayliss, D.; Everett, M.; Howell, S. B.; Hellier, C.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; West, R. G.; Brown, D. J. A.; Schanche, N.; Barkaoui, K.; Pozuelos, F.; Gillon, M.; Jehin, E.; Benkhaldoun, Z.; Daassou, A.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.; Seager, S.; Jenkins, J. M.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Armstrong, J. D.; Collins, K. I.; Gan, T.; Hart, R.; Horne, K.; Kielkopf, J. F.; Nielsen, L. D.; Nishiumi, T.; Narita, N.; Palle, E.; Relles, Howard M.; Sefako, R.; Tan, T. G.; Davies, M.; Goeke, Robert F.; Guerrero, N.; Haworth, K.; Villanueva, S.
Abstract: Wide-field surveys for transiting planets are well suited to searching diverse stellar populations, enabling a better understanding of the link between the properties of planets and their parent stars. We report the discovery of HAT-P-69 b (TOI 625.01) and HAT-P-70 b (TOI 624.01), two new hot Jupiters around A stars from the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) survey that have also been observed by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. HAT-P-69 b has a mass of {3.58}-0.58+0.58 M Jup and a radius of {1.676}-0.033+0.051 R Jup and resides in a prograde 4.79 day orbit. HAT-P-70 b has a radius of {1.87}-0.10+0.15 R Jup and a mass constraint of and a mass constraint of Jup and resides in a retrograde 2.74 day orbit. We use the confirmation of these planets around relatively massive stars as an opportunity to explore the occurrence rate of hot Jupiters as a function of stellar mass. We define a sample of 47,126 main-sequence stars brighter than T mag = 10 that yields 31 giant planet candidates, including 18 confirmed planets, 3 candidates, and 10 false positives. We find a net hot Jupiter occurrence rate of 0.41 ± 0.10% within this sample, consistent with the rate measured by Kepler for FGK stars. When divided into stellar mass bins, we find the occurrence rate to be 0.71 ± 0.31% for G stars, 0.43 ± 0.15% for F stars, and 0.26 ± 0.11% for A stars. Thus, at this point, we cannot discern any statistically significant trend in the occurrence of hot Jupiters with stellar mass. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. This work makes use of the Smithsonian Institution High Performance Cluster (SI/HPC). Based in part on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).
HAT-TR-318-007: A Double-lined M Dwarf Binary with Total Secondary Eclipses Discovered by HATNet and Observed by K2Hartman, J. D.Quinn, S. N.Bakos, G. Á.Torres, G.Kovács, G.Latham, D. W.Noyes, R. W.Shporer, A.Fulton, B. J.Esquerdo, Gilbert A.Everett, M. E.Penev, K.Bhatti, W.Csubry, Z.DOI: info:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa844v. 155114
Hartman, J. D., Quinn, S. N., Bakos, G. Á., Torres, G., Kovács, G., Latham, D. W., Noyes, R. W., Shporer, A., Fulton, B. J., Esquerdo, Gilbert A., Everett, M. E., Penev, K., Bhatti, W., and Csubry, Z. 2018. "HAT-TR-318-007: A Double-lined M Dwarf Binary with Total Secondary Eclipses Discovered by HATNet and Observed by K2." The Astronomical Journal 155:114. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/aaa844
ID: 146166
Type: article
Authors: Hartman, J. D.; Quinn, S. N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Everett, M. E.; Penev, K.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of HAT-TR-318-007, a P=3.34395390+/- 0.00000020 day period detached double-lined M dwarf binary with total secondary eclipses. We combine radial velocity (RV) measurements from TRES/FLWO 1.5 m and time-series photometry from HATNet, FLWO 1.2 m, BOS 0.8 m, and NASA K2 Campaign 5, to determine the masses and radii of the component stars: MA=0.448+/-0.011 MN, MB=0.2721-0.0042+0.0041 MN, RA=0.4548-0.0036+0.0035 RN, and RB=0.2913-0.0024+0.0023 RN. We obtained a FIRE/Magellan near-infrared spectrum of the primary star during a total secondary eclipse, and we use this to obtain disentangled spectra of both components. We determine spectral types of STA=M 3.71+/- 0.69 and STB=M 5.01+/- 0.73 and effective temperatures of Teff, A= 3190+/-110 K and Teff, B=3100+/- 110 K for the primary and secondary star, respectively. We also measure a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.298+/- 0.080 for the system. We find that the system has a small, but significant, nonzero eccentricity of 0.0136+/- 0.0026. The K2 light curve shows a coherent variation at a period of 3.41315-0.00032+0.00030 days, which is slightly longer than the orbital period, and which we demonstrate comes from the primary star. We interpret this as the rotation period of the primary. We perform a quantitative comparison between the Dartmouth stellar evolution models and the seven systems, including HAT-TR-318-007, that contain M dwarfs with 0.2 MNN, have metallicity measurements, and have masses and radii determined to better than 5% precision. Discrepancies between the predicted and observed masses and radii are found for three of the systems.
HAT-P-67b: An Extremely Low Density Saturn Transiting an F-subgiant Confirmed via Doppler TomographyZhou, GeorgeBakos, G. Á.Hartman, J. D.Latham, D. W.Torres, G.Bhatti, W.Penev, K.Buchhave, L.Kovács, G.Bieryla, A.Quinn, S.Isaacson, H.Fulton, B. J.Falco, E.Csubry, Z.Everett, M.Szklenar, T.Esquerdo, G.Berlind, P.Calkins, Michael L.Béky, B.Knox, R. P.Hinz, P.Horch, E. P.Hirsch, L.Howell, S. B.Noyes, R. W.Marcy, G.de Val-Borro, M.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.3847/1538-3881/aa674av. 153211
Zhou, George, Bakos, G. Á., Hartman, J. D., Latham, D. W., Torres, G., Bhatti, W., Penev, K., Buchhave, L., Kovács, G., Bieryla, A., Quinn, S., Isaacson, H., Fulton, B. J., Falco, E., Csubry, Z., Everett, M., Szklenar, T., Esquerdo, G., Berlind, P., Calkins, Michael L., Béky, B., Knox, R. P., Hinz, P., Horch, E. P., Hirsch, L. et al. 2017. "HAT-P-67b: An Extremely Low Density Saturn Transiting an F-subgiant Confirmed via Doppler Tomography." The Astronomical Journal 153:211. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/aa674a
ID: 143338
Type: article
Authors: Zhou, George; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Latham, D. W.; Torres, G.; Bhatti, W.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L.; Kovács, G.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Isaacson, H.; Fulton, B. J.; Falco, E.; Csubry, Z.; Everett, M.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, Michael L.; Béky, B.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Horch, E. P.; Hirsch, L.; Howell, S. B.; Noyes, R. W.; Marcy, G.; de Val-Borro, M.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery of HAT-P-67b, which is a hot-Saturn transiting a rapidly rotating F-subgiant. HAT-P-67b has a radius of {R}{{p}}={2.085}-0.071+0.096 {R}{{J}}, and orbites a {M}* ={1.642}-0.072+0.155 {M}, {R}* ={2.546}-0.084+0.099 {R} host star in a ˜4.81 day period orbit. We place an upper limit on the mass of the planet via radial velocity measurements to be {M}{{p}}}}{{J}}, and a lower limit of > 0.056 {M}{{J}} by limitations on Roche lobe overflow. Despite being a subgiant, the host star still exhibits relatively rapid rotation, with a projected rotational velocity of v\sin {I}\star =35.8+/- 1.1 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which makes it difficult to precisely determine the mass of the planet using radial velocities. We validated HAT-P-67b via two Doppler tomographic detections of the planetary transit, which eliminate potential eclipsing binary blend scenarios. The Doppler tomographic observations also confirm that HAT-P-67b has an orbit that is aligned to within 12°, in projection, with the spin of its host star. HAT-P-67b receives strong
HATS-18b: An Extreme Short-period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its StarPenev, K.Hartman, J. D.Bakos, G. Á.Ciceri, S.Brahm, R.Bayliss, D.Bento, J.Jordán, A.Csubry, Z.Bhatti, W.de Val-Borro, M.Espinoza, N.Zhou, GeorgeMancini, L.Rabus, M.Suc, V.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Noyes, R. W.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.3847/0004-6256/152/5/127v. 152127
Penev, K., Hartman, J. D., Bakos, G. Á., Ciceri, S., Brahm, R., Bayliss, D., Bento, J., Jordán, A., Csubry, Z., Bhatti, W., de Val-Borro, M., Espinoza, N., Zhou, George, Mancini, L., Rabus, M., Suc, V., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Noyes, R. W., Lázár, J., Papp, I., and Sári, P. 2016. "HATS-18b: An Extreme Short-period Massive Transiting Planet Spinning Up Its Star." The Astronomical Journal 152:127. https://doi.org/10.3847/0004-6256/152/5/127
ID: 141924
Type: article
Authors: Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Bayliss, D.; Bento, J.; Jordán, A.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Zhou, George; Mancini, L.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18b: a 1.980+/- 0.077 {M}{{J}}, {1.337}-0.049+0.102 {R}{{J}} planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037+/- 0.047 {M} and radius {1.020}-0.031+0.057 {R}) with V=14.067+/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range of 6.5≲ {{log}}10({Q}* /{k}2)≲ 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star-planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic, or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the MPG 2.2 m telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.
HAT-P-54b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a 0.6 M? Star in Field 0 of the K2 MissionBakos, G. Á.Hartman, J. D.Bhatti, W.Bieryla, A.de Val-Borro, M.Latham, D. W.Buchhave, L. A.Csubry, Z.Penev, K.Kovács, G.Béky, B.Falco, E.Kovács, T.Howard, A. W.Johnson, J. A.Isaacson, H.Marcy, G. W.Torres, G.Noyes, R. W.Berlind, P.Calkins, Michael L.Esquerdo, Gilbert A.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/149/4/149v. 149149
Bakos, G. Á., Hartman, J. D., Bhatti, W., Bieryla, A., de Val-Borro, M., Latham, D. W., Buchhave, L. A., Csubry, Z., Penev, K., Kovács, G., Béky, B., Falco, E., Kovács, T., Howard, A. W., Johnson, J. A., Isaacson, H., Marcy, G. W., Torres, G., Noyes, R. W., Berlind, P., Calkins, Michael L., Esquerdo, Gilbert A., Lázár, J., Papp, I., and Sári, P. 2015. "HAT-P-54b: A Hot Jupiter Transiting a 0.6 M? Star in Field 0 of the K2 Mission." The Astronomical Journal 149:149. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/149/4/149
ID: 136019
Type: article
Authors: Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bieryla, A.; de Val-Borro, M.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Kovács, G.; Béky, B.; Falco, E.; Kovács, T.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery of HAT-P-54b, a planet transiting a late K dwarf star in field 0 of the NASA K2 mission. We combine ground-based photometric light curves with radial velocity measurements to determine the physical parameters of the system. HAT-P-54b has a mass of 0.760\ /- 0.032 {{M}J}, a radius of 0.944 ± 0.028 {{R}J}, and an orbital period of 3.7998 days. The star has V=13.505\ /- 0.060, a mass of 0.645\ /- 0.020 {{M}}, a radius of 0.617\ /- 0.013 {{R}}, an effective temperature of {{T}eff\star }=4390\ /- 50, and a subsolar metallicity of [Fe/H]=-0.127\ /- 0.080. We also detect a periodic signal with P = 15.6 days and 5.6 mmag amplitude in the light curve, which we interpret as due to the rotation of the star. HAT-P-54b has a radius that is smaller than 92% of the known transiting planets with masses greater than that of Saturn, while HAT-P-54 is one of the lowest-mass stars known to host a hot Jupiter. Follow-up high-precision photometric observations by the
HATS-7b: A Hot Super Neptune Transiting a Quiet K Dwarf StarBakos, G. Á.Penev, K.Bayliss, D.Hartman, J. D.Zhou, GeorgeBrahm, R.Mancini, L.de Val-Borro, M.Bhatti, W.Jordán, A.Rabus, M.Espinoza, N.Csubry, Z.Howard, A. W.Fulton, B. J.Buchhave, L. A.Ciceri, S.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Isaacson, H.Noyes, R. W.Marcy, G. W.Suc, V.Howe, A. R.Burrows, A. S.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-637X/813/2/111v. 813111
Bakos, G. Á., Penev, K., Bayliss, D., Hartman, J. D., Zhou, George, Brahm, R., Mancini, L., de Val-Borro, M., Bhatti, W., Jordán, A., Rabus, M., Espinoza, N., Csubry, Z., Howard, A. W., Fulton, B. J., Buchhave, L. A., Ciceri, S., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Isaacson, H., Noyes, R. W., Marcy, G. W., Suc, V., Howe, A. R., Burrows, A. S. et al. 2015. "HATS-7b: A Hot Super Neptune Transiting a Quiet K Dwarf Star." The Astrophysical Journal 813:111. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/813/2/111
ID: 140537
Type: article
Authors: Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, George; Brahm, R.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Jordán, A.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Isaacson, H.; Noyes, R. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-7b, a transiting Super-Neptune with a mass of 0.120 ± 0.012 {M}{{J}}, a radius of {0.563}-0.034+0.046 {R}{{J}}, and an orbital period of 3.1853 days. The host star is a moderately bright (V=13.340\+/- 0.010 mag, {K}S=10.976\+/- 0.026 mag) K dwarf star with a mass of 0.849 ± 0.027 {M}, a radius of {0.815}-0.035+0.049 {R}, and a metallicity of [{Fe}/{{H}}] =+0.250\+/- 0.080. The star is photometrically quiet to within the precision of the HATSouth measurements, has low RV jitter, and shows no evidence for chromospheric activity in its spectrum. HATS-7b is the second smallest radius planet discovered by a wide-field ground-based transit survey, and one of only a handful of Neptune-size planets with mass and radius determined to 10% precision. Theoretical modeling of HATS-7b yields a hydrogen-helium fraction of 18 ± 4% (rock-iron core and H2-He envelope), or 9 ± 4% (ice core and H2-He envelope), i.e., it has a composition broadly similar to that of Uranus and Neptune, and very different from that of Saturn, which has 75% of its mass in H2-He. Based on a sample of transiting exoplanets with accurately (-He. Based on a sample of transiting exoplanets with accurately ({{J}}\lt {M}{{p}}\lt 0.18 {M}{{J}}). The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 10 m Keck-I telescope at Mauna Kea, the MPG 2.2 m and ESO 3.6 m telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.
HATS-8b: A Low-density Transiting Super-NeptuneBayliss, D.Hartman, J. D.Bakos, G. Á.Penev, K.Zhou, GeorgeBrahm, R.Rabus, M.Jordán, A.Mancini, L.de Val-Borro, M.Bhatti, W.Espinoza, N.Csubry, Z.Howard, A. W.Fulton, B. J.Buchhave, L. A.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Ciceri, S.Noyes, R. W.Isaacson, H.Marcy, G. W.Suc, V.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/150/2/49v. 15049
Bayliss, D., Hartman, J. D., Bakos, G. Á., Penev, K., Zhou, George, Brahm, R., Rabus, M., Jordán, A., Mancini, L., de Val-Borro, M., Bhatti, W., Espinoza, N., Csubry, Z., Howard, A. W., Fulton, B. J., Buchhave, L. A., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Ciceri, S., Noyes, R. W., Isaacson, H., Marcy, G. W., Suc, V., Lázár, J., Papp, I. et al. 2015. "HATS-8b: A Low-density Transiting Super-Neptune." The Astronomical Journal 150:49. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/150/2/49
ID: 137332
Type: article
Authors: Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Zhou, George; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Espinoza, N.; Csubry, Z.; Howard, A. W.; Fulton, B. J.; Buchhave, L. A.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Ciceri, S.; Noyes, R. W.; Isaacson, H.; Marcy, G. W.; Suc, V.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: HATS-8b is a low density transiting super-Neptune discovered as part of the HATSouth project. The planet orbits its solar-like G-dwarf host (V = 14.03+/- 0.10, {T}{eff} = 5679+/- 50 K) with a period of 3.5839 days. HATS-8b is the third lowest-mass transiting exoplanet to be discovered from a wide-field ground-based search, and with a mass of 0.138+/- 0.019 {M}{{J}} it is approximately halfway between the masses of Neptune and Saturn. However, HATS-8b has a radius of {0.873}-0.075+0.123 {R}{{J}}, resulting in a bulk density of just 0.259+/- 0.091 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. The metallicity of the host star is super-solar ([{Fe}/{{H}}] = 0.210+/- 0.080), providing evidence against the idea that low-density exoplanets form from metal-poor environments. The low density and large radius of HATS-8b results in an atmospheric scale height of almost 1000 km, and in addition to this there is an excellent reference star of nearly equal magnitude at just 19″ separation in the sky. These factors make HATS-8b an exciting target for future atmospheric characterization studies, particularly for long-slit transmission spectroscopy. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located in LCO, Chile. The work is based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope and the ESO 3.6 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained using the facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.
HATS9-b and HATS10-b: Two Compact Hot Jupiters in Field 7 of the K2 MissionBrahm, R.Jordán, A.Hartman, J. D.Bakos, G. Á.Bayliss, D.Penev, K.Zhou, GeorgeCiceri, S.Rabus, M.Espinoza, N.Mancini, L.de Val-Borro, M.Bhatti, W.Sato, B.Tan, T. G.Csubry, Z.Buchhave, L.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Suc, V.Noyes, R. W.Papp, I.Lázár, J.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/150/1/33v. 15033
Brahm, R., Jordán, A., Hartman, J. D., Bakos, G. Á., Bayliss, D., Penev, K., Zhou, George, Ciceri, S., Rabus, M., Espinoza, N., Mancini, L., de Val-Borro, M., Bhatti, W., Sato, B., Tan, T. G., Csubry, Z., Buchhave, L., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Suc, V., Noyes, R. W., Papp, I., Lázár, J., and Sári, P. 2015. "HATS9-b and HATS10-b: Two Compact Hot Jupiters in Field 7 of the K2 Mission." The Astronomical Journal 150:33. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/150/1/33
ID: 136987
Type: article
Authors: Brahm, R.; Jordán, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Zhou, George; Ciceri, S.; Rabus, M.; Espinoza, N.; Mancini, L.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Sato, B.; Tan, T. G.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R. W.; Papp, I.; Lázár, J.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 ± 1.5 Gyr) V = 13.3 G dwarf star with a period P≈ 1.9153 days. The host star has a mass of 1.03 {M}ȯ , radius of 1.503 {R}ȯ , and effective temperature 5366 ± 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.065 {R}{{J}}, yielding a mean density of 0.85 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. HATS-10b orbits a V = 13.1 G dwarf star with a period P≈ 3.3128 days. The host star has a mass of 1.1 {M}ȯ , radius of 1.11 {R}ȯ , and effective temperature 5880 ± 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 {M}{{J}} and radius of 0.97 {R}{{J}}, yielding a mean density of 0.7 {{g}} {{cm}}-3. Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2, but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterization of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provide measurements of its reflected light signature. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.
HAT-P-57b: A Short-period Giant Planet Transiting a Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler TomographyHartman, J. D.Bakos, G. Á.Buchhave, L. A.Torres, G.Latham, D. W.Kovács, G.Bhatti, W.Csubry, Z.de Val-Borro, M.Penev, K.Huang, C. X.Béky, B.Bieryla, A.Quinn, Samuel N.Howard, A. W.Marcy, G. W.Johnson, J. A.Isaacson, H.Fischer, D. A.Noyes, R. W.Falco, E.Esquerdo, Gilbert A.Knox, R. P.Hinz, P.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/150/6/197v. 150197
Hartman, J. D., Bakos, G. Á., Buchhave, L. A., Torres, G., Latham, D. W., Kovács, G., Bhatti, W., Csubry, Z., de Val-Borro, M., Penev, K., Huang, C. X., Béky, B., Bieryla, A., Quinn, Samuel N., Howard, A. W., Marcy, G. W., Johnson, J. A., Isaacson, H., Fischer, D. A., Noyes, R. W., Falco, E., Esquerdo, Gilbert A., Knox, R. P., Hinz, P., Lázár, J. et al. 2015. "HAT-P-57b: A Short-period Giant Planet Transiting a Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography." The Astronomical Journal 150:197. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/150/6/197
ID: 138599
Type: article
Authors: Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Huang, C. X.; Béky, B.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Fischer, D. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Falco, E.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V=10.465+/- 0.029 mag, {T}{{eff}}=7500+/- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v{sin}i=102.1+/- 1.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R=1.413+/- 0.054 {R}{{J}} and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M\lt 1.85 {M}{{J}}. Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47+/- 0.12 {M}ȯ and 1.500+/- 0.050 {R}ȯ , respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P-57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16\buildrel{\circ}\over{.} 7\lt λ \lt 3\buildrel{\circ}\over{.} 3 or 27\buildrel{\circ}\over{.} 6\lt λ \lt 57\buildrel{\circ}\over{.} 4 at 95% confidence, and with relative probabilities for the two modes of 26% and 74%, respectively. Adaptive optics imaging with MMT/Clio2 reveals an object located 2\buildrel{\prime\prime}\over{.} 7 from HAT-P-57 consisting of two point sources separated in turn from each other by 0\buildrel{\prime\prime}\over{.} 22. The H- and {L}\prime -band magnitudes of the companion stars are consistent with their being physically associated with HAT-P-57, in which case they are stars of mass 0.61+/- 0.10 {M}ȯ and 0.53+/- 0.08 {M}ȯ . HAT-P-57 is the most rapidly rotating star, and only the fourth main sequence A star, known to host a transiting planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations made with the Keck-I telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory, HI (Keck time awarded through NASA programs N029Hr, N108Hr, N154Hr and N130Hr and NOAO programs A289Hr, and A284Hr). Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona.
HATS-6b: A Warm Saturn Transiting an Early M Dwarf Star, and a Set of Empirical Relations for Characterizing K and M Dwarf Planet HostsHartman, J. D.Bayliss, D.Brahm, R.Bakos, G. Á.Mancini, L.Jordán, A.Penev, K.Rabus, M.Zhou, GeorgeButler, R. P.Espinoza, N.de Val-Borro, M.Bhatti, W.Csubry, Z.Ciceri, S.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Arriagada, P.Shectman, S.Crane, J.Thompson, I.Suc, V.Csák, B.Tan, T. G.Noyes, R. W.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/149/5/166v. 149166
Hartman, J. D., Bayliss, D., Brahm, R., Bakos, G. Á., Mancini, L., Jordán, A., Penev, K., Rabus, M., Zhou, George, Butler, R. P., Espinoza, N., de Val-Borro, M., Bhatti, W., Csubry, Z., Ciceri, S., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Arriagada, P., Shectman, S., Crane, J., Thompson, I., Suc, V., Csák, B., Tan, T. G., Noyes, R. W. et al. 2015. "HATS-6b: A Warm Saturn Transiting an Early M Dwarf Star, and a Set of Empirical Relations for Characterizing K and M Dwarf Planet Hosts." The Astronomical Journal 149:166. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/149/5/166
ID: 136436
Type: article
Authors: Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Brahm, R.; Bakos, G. Á.; Mancini, L.; Jordán, A.; Penev, K.; Rabus, M.; Zhou, George; Butler, R. P.; Espinoza, N.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Arriagada, P.; Shectman, S.; Crane, J.; Thompson, I.; Suc, V.; Csák, B.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-6b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 15.2 mag, i = 13.7 mag M1V star with a mass of 0.57 {{M}ȯ } and a radius of 0.57 {{R}ȯ }. HATS-6b has a period of P = 3.3253 d, mass of {{M}p} = 0.32 {{M}J}, radius of {{R}p} = 1.00 {{R}J}, and zero-albedo equilibrium temperature of {{T}eq} = 712.8 ± 5.1 K. HATS-6 is one of the lowest mass stars known to host a close-in gas giant planet, and its transits are among the deepest of any known transiting planet system. We discuss the follow-up opportunities afforded by this system, noting that despite the faintness of the host star, it is expected to have the highest K-band S/N transmission spectrum among known gas giant planets with {{T}eq}\lt 750 K. In order to characterize the star we present a new set of empirical relations between the density, radius, mass, bolometric magnitude, and V-, J-, H- and K-band bolometric corrections for main sequence stars with M\lt 0.80 {{M}ȯ }, or spectral types later than K5. These relations are calibrated using eclipsing binary components as well as members of resolved binary systems. We account for intrinsic scatter in the relations in a self-consistent manner. We show that from the transit-based stellar density alone it is possible to measure the mass and radius of a ∼0.6 {{M}ȯ } star to ∼7 and ∼2% precision, respectively. Incorporating additional information, such as the V-K color, or an absolute magnitude, allows the precision to be improved by up to a factor of two. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located as Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Based in part on observations made with the MPG 2.2 m Telescope and the ESO 3.6 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.
HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet SurveyHartman, J. D.Bhatti, W.Bakos, G. Á.Bieryla, A.Kovács, G.Latham, D. W.Csubry, Z.de Val-Borro, M.Penev, K.Buchhave, L. A.Torres, G.Howard, A. W.Marcy, G. W.Johnson, J. A.Isaacson, H.Sato, B.Boisse, I.Falco, E.Everett, M. E.Szklenar, T.Fulton, B. J.Shporer, A.Kovács, T.Hansen, T.Béky, B.Noyes, R. W.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/150/6/168v. 150168
Hartman, J. D., Bhatti, W., Bakos, G. Á., Bieryla, A., Kovács, G., Latham, D. W., Csubry, Z., de Val-Borro, M., Penev, K., Buchhave, L. A., Torres, G., Howard, A. W., Marcy, G. W., Johnson, J. A., Isaacson, H., Sato, B., Boisse, I., Falco, E., Everett, M. E., Szklenar, T., Fulton, B. J., Shporer, A., Kovács, T., Hansen, T., Béky, B. et al. 2015. "HAT-P-50b, HAT-P-51b, HAT-P-52b, and HAT-P-53b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters and a Transiting Hot Saturn From the HATNet Survey." The Astronomical Journal 150:168. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/150/6/168
ID: 138601
Type: article
Authors: Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bieryla, A.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Sato, B.; Boisse, I.; Falco, E.; Everett, M. E.; Szklenar, T.; Fulton, B. J.; Shporer, A.; Kovács, T.; Hansen, T.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery and characterization of four transiting exoplanets by the HATNet survey. The planet HAT-P-50b has a mass of 1.35 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.29 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a bright (V=11.8 mag) M=1.27 {M}ȯ , R=1.70 {R}ȯ star every P=3.1220 days. The planet HAT-P-51b has a mass of 0.31 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.29 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=13.4 mag, M=0.98 {M}ȯ , R=1.04 {R}ȯ star with a period of P=4.2180 days. The planet HAT-P-52b has a mass of 0.82 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.01 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=14.1 mag, M=0.89 {M}ȯ , R=0.89 {R}ȯ star with a period of P=2.7536 days. The planet HAT-P-53b has a mass of 1.48 {M}{{J}} and radius of 1.32 {R}{{J}}, and orbits a V=13.7 mag, M=1.09 {M}ȯ , R=1.21 {R}ȯ star with a period of P=1.9616 days. All four planets are consistent with having circular orbits and have masses and radii measured to better than 10% precision. The low stellar jitter and favorable {R}p/{R}\star ratio for HAT-P-51 make it a promising target for measuring the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect for a Saturn-mass planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A245Hr) and NASA (N154Hr, N130Hr). Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in AZ. Based on radial velocities obtained with the Sophie spectrograph mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence. Based on observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.
HATS-13b and HATS-14b: two transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth surveyMancini, L.Hartman, J. D.Penev, K.Bakos, G. Á.Brahm, R.Ciceri, S.Henning, ThCsubry, Z.Bayliss, D.Zhou, GeorgeRabus, M.de Val-Borro, M.Espinoza, N.Jordán, A.Suc, V.Bhatti, W.Schmidt, B.Sato, B.Tan, T. G.Wright, D. J.Tinney, C. G.Addison, B. C.Noyes, R. W.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1051/0004-6361/201526069v. 580A63
Mancini, L., Hartman, J. D., Penev, K., Bakos, G. Á., Brahm, R., Ciceri, S., Henning, Th, Csubry, Z., Bayliss, D., Zhou, George, Rabus, M., de Val-Borro, M., Espinoza, N., Jordán, A., Suc, V., Bhatti, W., Schmidt, B., Sato, B., Tan, T. G., Wright, D. J., Tinney, C. G., Addison, B. C., Noyes, R. W., Lázár, J., Papp, I. et al. 2015. "HATS-13b and HATS-14b: two transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey." Astronomy and Astrophysics 580:A63. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201526069
ID: 137336
Type: article
Authors: Mancini, L.; Hartman, J. D.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th; Csubry, Z.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, George; Rabus, M.; de Val-Borro, M.; Espinoza, N.; Jordán, A.; Suc, V.; Bhatti, W.; Schmidt, B.; Sato, B.; Tan, T. G.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery of HATS-13b and HATS-14b, which are two hot-Jupiter transiting planets discovered by the HATSouth survey. The host stars are quite similar to each other (HATS-13: V = 13.9 mag, M = 0.96 M, R = 0.89 R, Teff ≈ 5500 K, [Fe/H] = 0.05; HATS-14: V = 13.8 mag, M = 0.97 M, R = 0.93 R, Teff ≈ 5350 K, [Fe/H] = 0.33) and both the planets orbit around them with a period of ~3 days and a separation of ~0.04 au. However, even though they are irradiated in a similar way, the physical characteristics of the two planets are very different. HATS-13b, with a mass of Mp = 0.543 ± 0.072 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.212 ± 0.035 RJ, appears as an inflated planet, while HATS-14b, having a mass of Mp = 1.071 ± 0.070 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.039 ± 0.032 RJ, is only slightly larger in radius than Jupiter. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. Based in part on observations made with (i) the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; (ii) the MPG 2.2 m and the (iii) Euler 1.2 m Telescopes at the ESO Observatory in La Silla; (iv) the CTIO 0.9 m Telescope at the Observatory of Cerro Tololo.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Table A.1 and RV Tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz- bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A63
A 0.24+0.18 M⊙ double-lined eclipsing binary from the HATSouth surveyZhou, GeorgeBayliss, D.Hartman, J. D.Rabus, M.Bakos, G. Á.Jordán, A.Brahm, R.Penev, K.Csubry, Z.Mancini, L.Espinoza, N.de Val-Borro, M.Bhatti, W.Ciceri, S.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Murphy, S. J.Butler, R. P.Arriagada, P.Shectman, S.Crane, J.Thompson, I.Suc, V.Noyes, R. W.DOI: info:10.1093/mnras/stv1070v. 4512263–2277
Zhou, George, Bayliss, D., Hartman, J. D., Rabus, M., Bakos, G. Á., Jordán, A., Brahm, R., Penev, K., Csubry, Z., Mancini, L., Espinoza, N., de Val-Borro, M., Bhatti, W., Ciceri, S., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Murphy, S. J., Butler, R. P., Arriagada, P., Shectman, S., Crane, J., Thompson, I., Suc, V., and Noyes, R. W. 2015. "A 0.24+0.18 M⊙ double-lined eclipsing binary from the HATSouth survey." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 451:2263– 2277. https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stv1070
ID: 137291
Type: article
Authors: Zhou, George; Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Rabus, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Jordán, A.; Brahm, R.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Mancini, L.; Espinoza, N.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Murphy, S. J.; Butler, R. P.; Arriagada, P.; Shectman, S.; Crane, J.; Thompson, I.; Suc, V.; Noyes, R. W.
Abstract: We report the discovery and characterization of a new M-dwarf binary, with component masses and radii of M_1 = 0.244_{-0.003}^{+0.003} M_{⊙}, R_1 = 0.261_{-0.009}^{+0.006} R_{⊙}, M_2 = 0.179_{-0.001}^{+0.002} M_{⊙}, R_2 = 0.218 _{-0.011}^{+0.007} R_{⊙}, and orbital period of ˜4.1 d. The M-dwarf binary HATS551-027 (LP 837-20) was identified as an eclipsing binary by the HATSouth survey, and characterized by a series of high-precision photometric observations of the eclipse events, and spectroscopic determinations of the atmospheric parameters and radial velocity orbits. HATS551-027 is one of few systems with both stellar components lying in the fully convective regime of very low mass stars, and can serve as a test for stellar interior models. The radius of HATS551-027A is consistent with models to 1σ, whilst HATS551-027B is inflated by 9 per cent at 2σ significance. We measure the effective temperatures for the two stellar components to be Teff, 1 = 3190 ± 100 K and Teff, 2 = 2990 ± 110 K; both are slightly cooler than theoretical models predict, but consistent with other M-dwarfs of similar masses that have previously been studied. We also measure significant H α emission from both components of the binary system, and discuss this in the context of the correlation between stellar activity and the discrepancies between the observed and model temperatures.
Stellar Rotation-Planetary Orbit Period Commensurability in the HAT-P-11 SystemBéky, BenceHolman, Matthew J.Kipping, David M.Noyes, Robert W.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-637X/788/1/1v. 7881
Béky, Bence, Holman, Matthew J., Kipping, David M., and Noyes, Robert W. 2014. "Stellar Rotation-Planetary Orbit Period Commensurability in the HAT-P-11 System." The Astrophysical Journal 788:1. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/788/1/1
ID: 127260
Type: article
Authors: Béky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Kipping, David M.; Noyes, Robert W.
Abstract: A number of planet host stars have been observed to rotate with a period equal to an integer multiple of the orbital period of their close planet. We expand this list by analyzing Kepler data of HAT-P-11 and finding a period ratio of 6:1. In particular, we present evidence for a long-lived spot on the stellar surface that is eclipsed by the planet in the same position four times, every sixth transit. We also identify minima in the out-of-transit light curve and confirm that their phase with respect to the stellar rotation is mostly stationary for the 48 month time frame of the observations, confirming the proposed rotation period. For comparison, we apply our methods to Kepler-17 and confirm the findings of Bonomo & Lanza that the period ratio is not exactly 8:1 in that system. Finally, we provide a hypothesis on how interactions between a star and its planet could possibly result in an observed commensurability for systems where the stellar differential rotation profile happens to include a period at some latitude that is commensurable to the planetary orbit.
HAT-P-49b: A 1.7 M J Planet Transiting a Bright 1.5 M ? F-starBieryla, A.Hartman, J. D.Bakos, G. Á.Bhatti, W.Kovács, G.Boisse, I.Latham, D. W.Buchhave, L. A.Csubry, Z.Penev, K.de Val-Borro, M.Béky, B.Falco, E.Torres, G.Noyes, R. W.Berlind, P.Calkins, M. C.Esquerdo, Gilbert A.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/147/4/84v. 14784
Bieryla, A., Hartman, J. D., Bakos, G. Á., Bhatti, W., Kovács, G., Boisse, I., Latham, D. W., Buchhave, L. A., Csubry, Z., Penev, K., de Val-Borro, M., Béky, B., Falco, E., Torres, G., Noyes, R. W., Berlind, P., Calkins, M. C., Esquerdo, Gilbert A., Lázár, J., Papp, I., and Sári, P. 2014. "HAT-P-49b: A 1.7 M J Planet Transiting a Bright 1.5 M ? F-star." The Astronomical Journal 147:84. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/147/4/84
ID: 120992
Type: article
Authors: Bieryla, A.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Kovács, G.; Boisse, I.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Béky, B.; Falco, E.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M. C.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery of the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-49b. The planet transits the bright (V = 10.3) slightly evolved F-star HD 340099 with a mass of 1.54 M ? and a radius of 1.83 R ?. HAT-P-49b is orbiting one of the 25 brightest stars to host a transiting planet which makes this a favorable candidate for detailed follow-up. This system is an especially strong target for Rossiter-McLaughlin follow-up due to the host star's fast rotation, 16 km s-1. The planetary companion has a period of 2.6915 days, mass of 1.73 M J, and radius of 1.41 R J. The planetary characteristics are consistent with that of a classical hot Jupiter but we note that this is the fourth most massive star to host a transiting planet with both Mp and Rp well determined. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Based in part on radial velocities obtained with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France.
HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-planet SystemsHartman, J. D.Bakos, G. Á.Torres, G.Kovács, G.Johnson, J. A.Howard, A. W.Marcy, G. W.Latham, D. W.Bieryla, A.Buchhave, L. A.Bhatti, W.Béky, B.Csubry, Z.Penev, K.de Val-Borro, M.Noyes, R. W.Fischer, D. A.Esquerdo, Gilbert A.Everett, M.Szklenár, T.Zhou, GeorgeBayliss, D.Shporer, A.Fulton, B. J.Sanchis-Ojeda, R.Falco, E.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/147/6/128v. 147128
Hartman, J. D., Bakos, G. Á., Torres, G., Kovács, G., Johnson, J. A., Howard, A. W., Marcy, G. W., Latham, D. W., Bieryla, A., Buchhave, L. A., Bhatti, W., Béky, B., Csubry, Z., Penev, K., de Val-Borro, M., Noyes, R. W., Fischer, D. A., Esquerdo, Gilbert A., Everett, M., Szklenár, T., Zhou, George, Bayliss, D., Shporer, A., Fulton, B. J., Sanchis-Ojeda, R. et al. 2014. "HAT-P-44b, HAT-P-45b, and HAT-P-46b: Three Transiting Hot Jupiters in Possible Multi-planet Systems." The Astronomical Journal 147:128. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/147/6/128
ID: 127274
Type: article
Authors: Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Buchhave, L. A.; Bhatti, W.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; de Val-Borro, M.; Noyes, R. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Everett, M.; Szklenár, T.; Zhou, George; Bayliss, D.; Shporer, A.; Fulton, B. J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Falco, E.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V = 13.2, 12.8, and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.35, 0.89, and 0.49 M J, and radii of 1.24, 1.43, and 1.28 R J. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 M . Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities, indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 872 days, eccentricity of 0.494 ± 0.081, and a minimum mass of 4.0 M J. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out alternative solutions for the outer planet having a period of 220 days or 438 days. For HAT-P-45, at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model; in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 ± 6.3 m s-1 is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 days and a minimum mass of 2.0 M J, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued radial velocity monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO (A284Hr) and NASA (N154Hr, N108Hr).
HATS-4b: A Dense Hot Jupiter Transiting a Super Metal-rich G starJordán, AndrésBrahm, RafaelBakos, G. Á.Bayliss, D.Penev, K.Hartman, J. D.Zhou, GeorgeMancini, L.Mohler-Fischer, M.Ciceri, S.Sato, B.Csubry, Z.Rabus, M.Suc, V.Espinoza, N.Bhatti, W.Borro, M. de ValBuchhave, L.Csák, B.Henning, T.Schmidt, B.Tan, T. G.Noyes, R. W.Béky, B.Butler, R. P.Shectman, S.Crane, J.Thompson, I.Williams, A.Martin, R.Contreras, C.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/148/2/29v. 14829
Jordán, Andrés, Brahm, Rafael, Bakos, G. Á., Bayliss, D., Penev, K., Hartman, J. D., Zhou, George, Mancini, L., Mohler-Fischer, M., Ciceri, S., Sato, B., Csubry, Z., Rabus, M., Suc, V., Espinoza, N., Bhatti, W., Borro, M. de Val, Buchhave, L., Csák, B., Henning, T., Schmidt, B., Tan, T. G., Noyes, R. W., Béky, B., Butler, R. P. et al. 2014. "HATS-4b: A Dense Hot Jupiter Transiting a Super Metal-rich G star." The Astronomical Journal 148:29. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/148/2/29
ID: 128160
Type: article
Authors: Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Bakos, G. Á.; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, George; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Sato, B.; Csubry, Z.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bhatti, W.; Borro, M. de Val; Buchhave, L.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R. W.; Béky, B.; Butler, R. P.; Shectman, S.; Crane, J.; Thompson, I.; Williams, A.; Martin, R.; Contreras, C.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of Mp ≈ 1.32 M Jup, radius of Rp ≈ 1.02 R Jup, and density of ρ p = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm-3 ≈1.24 ρJup. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M , a radius of 0.92 R , and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M J and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M . In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institution is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at LCO, Chile. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations made with the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope at the ESO Observatory in La Silla. This paper uses observations obtained with facilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope.
HATS-5b: A Transiting Hot Saturn from the HATSouth SurveyZhou, GeorgeBayliss, D.Penev, K.Bakos, G. Á.Hartman, J. D.Jordán, A.Mancini, L.Mohler, M.Csubry, Z.Ciceri, S.Brahm, R.Rabus, M.Buchhave, L.Henning, T.Suc, V.Espinoza, N.Béky, B.Noyes, R. W.Schmidt, B.Butler, R. P.Shectman, S.Thompson, I.Crane, J.Sato, B.Csák, B.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.Nikolov, N.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/147/6/144v. 147144
Zhou, George, Bayliss, D., Penev, K., Bakos, G. Á., Hartman, J. D., Jordán, A., Mancini, L., Mohler, M., Csubry, Z., Ciceri, S., Brahm, R., Rabus, M., Buchhave, L., Henning, T., Suc, V., Espinoza, N., Béky, B., Noyes, R. W., Schmidt, B., Butler, R. P., Shectman, S., Thompson, I., Crane, J., Sato, B., Csák, B. et al. 2014. "HATS-5b: A Transiting Hot Saturn from the HATSouth Survey." The Astronomical Journal 147:144. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/147/6/144
ID: 127272
Type: article
Authors: Zhou, George; Bayliss, D.; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Csubry, Z.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Butler, R. P.; Shectman, S.; Thompson, I.; Crane, J.; Sato, B.; Csák, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.; Nikolov, N.
Abstract: We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of Mp ≈ 0.24 M J, radius of Rp ≈ 0.91 R J, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M , and radius of 0.87 R . The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.
HATSouth: A Global Network of Fully Automated Identical Wide-Field TelescopesBakos, G. Á.Csubry, Z.Penev, K.Bayliss, D.Jordán, A.Afonso, C.Hartman, J. D.Henning, T.Kovács, G.Noyes, R. W.Béky, B.Suc, V.Csák, B.Rabus, M.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.Conroy, P.Zhou, GeorgeSackett, P. D.Schmidt, B.Mancini, L.Sasselov, D. D.Ueltzhoeffer, K.DOI: info:10.1086/669529v. 125154–182
Bakos, G. Á., Csubry, Z., Penev, K., Bayliss, D., Jordán, A., Afonso, C., Hartman, J. D., Henning, T., Kovács, G., Noyes, R. W., Béky, B., Suc, V., Csák, B., Rabus, M., Lázár, J., Papp, I., Sári, P., Conroy, P., Zhou, George, Sackett, P. D., Schmidt, B., Mancini, L., Sasselov, D. D., and Ueltzhoeffer, K. 2013. "HATSouth: A Global Network of Fully Automated Identical Wide-Field Telescopes." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 125:154– 182. https://doi.org/10.1086/669529
ID: 114751
Type: article
Authors: Bakos, G. Á.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K.; Bayliss, D.; Jordán, A.; Afonso, C.; Hartman, J. D.; Henning, T.; Kovács, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Béky, B.; Suc, V.; Csák, B.; Rabus, M.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.; Conroy, P.; Zhou, George; Sackett, P. D.; Schmidt, B.; Mancini, L.; Sasselov, D. D.; Ueltzhoeffer, K.
Abstract: HATSouth is the world's first network of automated and homogeneous telescopes that is capable of year-round 24 hr monitoring of positions over an entire hemisphere of the sky. The primary scientific goal of the network is to discover and characterize a large number of transiting extrasolar planets, reaching out to long periods and down to small planetary radii. HATSouth achieves this by monitoring extended areas on the sky, deriving high precision light curves for a large number of stars, searching for the signature of planetary transits, and confirming planetary candidates with larger telescopes. HATSouth employs six telescope units spread over three prime locations with large longitude separation in the southern hemisphere (Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; HESS site, Namibia; Siding Spring Observatory, Australia). Each of the HATSouth units holds four 0.18 m diameter f/2.8 focal ratio telescope tubes on a common mount producing an 8.2°×8.2° field of view on the sky, imaged using four 4 K × 4 K CCD cameras and Sloan r filters, to give a pixel scale of 3.7″ pixel-1. The HATSouth network is capable of continuously monitoring 128 square arc degrees at celestial positions moderately close to the anti-solar direction. We present the technical details of the network, summarize operations, and present detailed weather statistics for the three sites. Robust operations have meant that on average each of the six HATSouth units has conducted observations on ˜500 nights over a 2 years time period, yielding a total of more than 1 million science frames at a 4 minute integration time and observing ˜10.65 day-1 on average. We describe the scheme of our data transfer and reduction from raw pixel images to trend-filtered light curves and transiting planet candidates. Photometric precision reaches ˜6 mmag at 4 minute cadence for the brightest non-saturated stars at r≈10.5. We present detailed transit recovery simulations to determine the expected yield of transiting planets from HATSouth. We highlight the advantages of networked operations, namely, a threefold increase in the expected number of detected planets, as compared to all telescopes operating from the same site.
HATS-3b: An Inflated Hot Jupiter Transiting an F-type StarBayliss, D.Zhou, GeorgePenev, K.Bakos, G. Á.Hartman, J. D.Jordán, A.Mancini, L.Mohler-Fischer, M.Suc, V.Rabus, M.Béky, B.Csubry, Z.Buchhave, L.Henning, T.Nikolov, N.Csák, B.Brahm, R.Espinoza, N.Noyes, R. W.Schmidt, B.Conroy, P.Wright, D. J.Tinney, C. G.Addison, B. C.Sackett, P. D.Sasselov, D. D.Lázár, J.Papp, I.Sári, P.DOI: info:10.1088/0004-6256/146/5/113v. 146113
Bayliss, D., Zhou, George, Penev, K., Bakos, G. Á., Hartman, J. D., Jordán, A., Mancini, L., Mohler-Fischer, M., Suc, V., Rabus, M., Béky, B., Csubry, Z., Buchhave, L., Henning, T., Nikolov, N., Csák, B., Brahm, R., Espinoza, N., Noyes, R. W., Schmidt, B., Conroy, P., Wright, D. J., Tinney, C. G., Addison, B. C., Sackett, P. D. et al. 2013. "HATS-3b: An Inflated Hot Jupiter Transiting an F-type Star." The Astronomical Journal 146:113. https://doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/146/5/113
ID: 118190
Type: article
Authors: Bayliss, D.; Zhou, George; Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Jordán, A.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Suc, V.; Rabus, M.; Béky, B.; Csubry, Z.; Buchhave, L.; Henning, T.; Nikolov, N.; Csák, B.; Brahm, R.; Espinoza, N.; Noyes, R. W.; Schmidt, B.; Conroy, P.; Wright, D. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Addison, B. C.; Sackett, P. D.; Sasselov, D. D.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.
Abstract: We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-3b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting a V = 12.4 F dwarf star. HATS-3b has a period of P = 3.5479 days, mass of Mp = 1.07 M J, and radius of Rp = 1.38 R J. Given the radius of the planet, the brightness of the host star, and the stellar rotational velocity (vsin i = 9.0 km s-1), this system will make an interesting target for future observations to measure the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and determine its spin-orbit alignment. We detail the low-/medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy that we are now using to deal with large numbers of transiting planet candidates produced by the HATSouth survey. We show that this important step in discovering planets produces log g and T eff parameters at a precision suitable for efficient candidate vetting, as well as efficiently identifying stellar mass eclipsing binaries with radial velocity semi-amplitudes as low as 1 km s-1. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), and the Australian National University (ANU). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with collaborators at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC), the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (HESS) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA, and the station at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) is operated jointly with ANU.