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Showing 1-6 of about 6 results.
Molecular detection of rickettsial agents of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from wild birds of PanamaBermúdez, SergioDomínguez, LillianOchoa, IsisOliveira, Jonathan GonçalvesDe Lemos, Elba,Regina SampaioCastillo, BernardoSmith, DioreneHerrera, JorgeOgrzewalska, Maria2020DOI: info:10.11158/saa.25.4.3Systematic and Applied Acarologyv. 25No. 4622632622–6321362-1971
Bermúdez, Sergio, Domínguez, Lillian, Ochoa, Isis, Oliveira, Jonathan Gonçalves, De Lemos, Elba,Regina Sampaio, Castillo, Bernardo, Smith, Diorene, Herrera, Jorge, and Ogrzewalska, Maria. 2020. "Molecular detection of rickettsial agents of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from wild birds of Panama." Systematic and Applied Acarology 25 (4):622–632. https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.25.4.3
ID: 154934
Type: article
Authors: Bermúdez, Sergio; Domínguez, Lillian; Ochoa, Isis; Oliveira, Jonathan Gonçalves; De Lemos, Elba,Regina Sampaio; Castillo, Bernardo; Smith, Diorene; Herrera, Jorge; Ogrzewalska, Maria
Keywords: STRI
Abstract: Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from wild birds in Panama were tested for the presence of tick-borne pathogens as Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, Borrelia, Hepatozoon sp., and Babesia. Overall 124 ticks were found in 57 birds belonging to 28 species: Amblyomma longirostre (32 larvae, 1 nymph), Amblyomma nodosum (30 nymphs), Amblyomma geayi (15 larvae, 1 nymph), Amblyomma varium (5 larvae, 2 nymphs), Amblyomma naponense (2 larvae), Amblyomma ovale (2 larvae), and Amblyomma calcaratum (1 larva). DNA of Rickettsia amblyommatis was detected in 65% of A. longirostre, 69% of A. geayi and 14% of A. varium. Moreover, results from two larvae of A. longirostre showed DNA of unidentified Rickettsia sp. No DNA of Borrelia, Bartonella, Anaplasmataceae neither Babesia nor Hepatozoon was detected. These results expand knowledge about the host for immature Amblyomma ticks in Panama and show the first data of Rickettsia in ticks collected from birds in this country.
Reproductive cycles in tropical intertidal gastropods are timed around tidal amplitude cyclesCollin, RachelKerr, KeciaContolini, GinaOchoa, Isis2017DOI: info:10.1002/ece3.3166Ecology and Evolutionv. 7No. 15597759915977–59912045-7758
Collin, Rachel, Kerr, Kecia, Contolini, Gina, and Ochoa, Isis. 2017. "Reproductive cycles in tropical intertidal gastropods are timed around tidal amplitude cycles." Ecology and Evolution 7 (15):5977–5991. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3166
ID: 143389
Type: article
Authors: Collin, Rachel; Kerr, Kecia; Contolini, Gina; Ochoa, Isis
Keywords: STRI; fellow
Influence of seasonal environmental variation on the reproduction of four tropical marine gastropodsCollin, RachelOchoa, Isis2016DOI: info:10.3354/meps11815Marine Ecology Progress Seriesv. 555125139125–1390171-8630
Collin, Rachel and Ochoa, Isis. 2016. "Influence of seasonal environmental variation on the reproduction of four tropical marine gastropods." Marine Ecology Progress Series 555:125–139. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11815
ID: 140145
Type: article
Authors: Collin, Rachel; Ochoa, Isis
Keywords: STRI; si-federal
Access to multiple mates increases fecundity but does not affect per-offspring maternal investment in a marine gastropodCollin, RachelOchoa, Isis2015DOI: info:10.1111/ivb.12109Invertebrate Biologyv. 134No. 4271281271–2811077-8306
Collin, Rachel and Ochoa, Isis. 2015. "Access to multiple mates increases fecundity but does not affect per-offspring maternal investment in a marine gastropod." Invertebrate Biology 134 (4):271–281. https://doi.org/10.1111/ivb.12109
ID: 138219
Type: article
Authors: Collin, Rachel; Ochoa, Isis
Keywords: NMNH; NH-Paleobiology; si-federal; STRI
Nest predation in a Neotropical forest occurs during daytimeLibsch, Michael M.Batista, ChelinaBuehler, Deborah M.Ochoa, IsisBrawn, Jeffrey D.Ricklefs, Robert E.2008DOI: info:10.1525/cond.2008.110.1.166The Condorv. 110No. 1166170166–1700010-5422
Libsch, Michael M., Batista, Chelina, Buehler, Deborah M., Ochoa, Isis, Brawn, Jeffrey D., and Ricklefs, Robert E. 2008. "Nest predation in a Neotropical forest occurs during daytime." The Condor 110 (1):166–170. https://doi.org/10.1525/cond.2008.110.1.166
ID: 73128
Type: article
Authors: Libsch, Michael M.; Batista, Chelina; Buehler, Deborah M.; Ochoa, Isis; Brawn, Jeffrey D.; Ricklefs, Robert E.
Keywords: Encyclopedia of Life; Forces of Change; nest activity; nest attentiveness; nest predation; parental investment; Skutch hypothesis; understory rainforest birds; stri
Bird diversity in cacao farms and forest fragments of western PanamáVan Bael, Sunshine A.Bichier, PeterOchoa, IsisGreenberg, Russell S.2007Biodiversity and Conservationv. 16224522562245–22560960-3115
Van Bael, Sunshine A., Bichier, Peter, Ochoa, Isis, and Greenberg, Russell S. 2007. "Bird diversity in cacao farms and forest fragments of western Panamá." Biodiversity and Conservation 16:2245–2256.
ID: 55703
Type: article
Authors: Van Bael, Sunshine A.; Bichier, Peter; Ochoa, Isis; Greenberg, Russell S.
Keywords: NH-EOL; STRI; NZP; mbc
Abstract: Theobroma cacao plantings, when managed under the shade of rainforest trees, provide habitat for many resident and migratory bird species. We compared the bird diversity and community structure in organic cacao farms and nearby forest fragments throughout mainland Bocas del Toro, Panama. We used this dataset to ask the following questions: (1) How do bird communities using cacao habitat compare to communities of nearby forest fragments? (2) To what extent do Northern migratory birds use shaded cacao farms, and do communities of resident birds shift their abundances in cacao farms seasonally? (3) Do small scale changes in shade management of cacao farms affect bird diversity? Using fixed radius point counts and additional observations, we recorded 234 landbird species, with 102 species that were observed in both cacao and forest fragments, 86 species that were only observed in cacao farms, and 46 species that were restricted to forest fragments. Cacao farms were rich in canopy and edge species such as tanagers, flycatchers and migratory warblers, but understory insectivores were nearly absent from cacao farms. We observed 27 migratory species, with 18 species in cacao farms only, two species in forest only, and seven species that occurred in both habitats. In cacao farms, the diversity of birds was significantly greater where there was less intensive management of the canopy shade trees. Shade tree species richness was most important for explaining variance in bird diversity. Our study shows that shaded cacao farms in western Panama provide habitat for a wide variety of resident and migratory bird species. Considering current land use trends in the region, we suggest that action must be taken to prevent conversion away from shaded cacao farms to land uses with lower biodiversity conservation value.